Why do houses burn in a fire?

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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote the following:

Ha!! We won't mention mod, will we?
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote the following:

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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invention7 unlisted.com wrote:

Frequently wetting the wood will very likely cause more damage than the risk of fire damage.
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>
> In the event a fire does break out, the wood will not burn or burn
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John Doe wrote the following:

The answer is to move the whole house to a more humid climate, like Costa Rica..
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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or the bottom of a swamp
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tnx all
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PLONK!
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote in news:bghh56t7o99d6gekidi418iq03mcb05t26@ 4ax.com:

I'll wait for a coupon.
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On Aug 3, 9:57pm, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

I don't think it is a good idea to be spraying water inside your home. Fire-alarms have reduced damage and casualties tremendously. You are entering a market at the wrong time.
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On Tue, 03 Aug 2010 20:57:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com

...
Hope you like mold.
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On Aug 3, 9:57pm, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

Others have mentioned mold, but I have solution for that.
We'll put gas burners inside the walls. Once a week or at any other set interval, flames will automatically ignite inside the walls, just enough to dry out the lumber. This will be hooked to a timer that automatically turns the flames on and off. This timer can be adjusted to turn on and off the flames once a week, once a month, or every day. You set it as you feel is necessary to keep that wood dry.
There will be an initial cost to install this system, but once installed, it will only add a few dollars to the gas bill every month. Well worth the satisfaction that your house is not a major mold factory waiting to occur.
As with you, my goal is to save lives and property, not to profit from this.
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On Tue, 03 Aug 2010 20:57:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

Carpenter ants are going to *love* you!

DOn't give up your day job. ;-)
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Sounds like a third grade school project.Won't be long he'll be back in school. Jr.
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
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Jerry - OHIO wrote:

the funny ones. OP in this thread wasn't even close. Make them work for it. 18 replies in less than 6 hours?
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aem sends...

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On Aug 3, 9:57pm, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

First, most of the deaths are due to smoke inhalation, not the fire itself.
Second, most of the framing is protected by 1-2 hour flameproof material like drywall.
Third, as one poster said, it is the curtains, couches, chairs and etc. (called teh fire load) that usually are on fire first.
Fourth, I think you need to re-think your place in this world.
Hank
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

Don't worry, you won't.
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dadiOH
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On Tue, 03 Aug 2010 20:57:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

I dont think this is a good idea. Like others said, mold will be a problem, and sheetrock will fall apart, and lots of other problems. I have a better solution.
Frame the house as usual. Apply a swinning pool liner on both the inside and outside of the studs. Apply sheetrock and siding as usual, but be careful not to puncture the pool liner. Then fill the entire walls with water, and keep them filled. Wood submerged in water does not rot or decay. Driftwood is a good example. If you were to have a house fire, the water would come out of the walls and make out the fire. This is how you do it !!!!
One problem I can see, is how to prevent the water from freezing in winter and pushing off the siding and wallboard. Maybe anti-freeze, or just salt water ??????? OR, have coils in the walls connected to the furnace and that would heat the water in the walls and that heated water would transfer the heat to the house via warm walls.
As a final note, I think the water would serve as excellent insulation.
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