Why are trusses being used in homes

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Our house is 40'x40', which includes a 6'x24' front porch.

The trussed section of our house is 16 feet wide, allowing for a 15 foot wide space in the living room and master suite (subtracting for the 2x6 walls). There is an interior bearing wall that runs the length of the house to support the inside end of the trusses.
My photos and time lapse video can explain it better:
http://www.mountain-software.com/projects/2003house.htm

Most building materials are 4' wide (plywood, sheetrock, etc.).
If you design your building on 4' increments, you will have less cutting to do, and less waste overall. That saves you time and money. You'll also end up with evenly spaced stud bays, which saves time when you install insulation.
Instead of 23'x30' I would go with 24'x28'. That just happens to be the same size as our garage:
http://www.mountain-software.com/projects/2001garage.htm

We built our house in 2003/2004, with no real prior experience. I designed in lots of bearing support so there were no major point loads. I used 2x10 floor joists (most spans are 12', except for the 15' spans in our living room and master suite).
I used 2x12 rafters for the vaulted ceilings, mostly to accomodate the required insulation.
Not counting our front porch, our house is only 1456 square feet. But the vaulted ceilings, open spaces, and avoidance of hallways makes it feel much larger. We love it!
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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On Jan 3, 1:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

It may use more lumber but it will be from smaller cheaper trees.
The load is distributed better. There are no large point loads on the walls.
Trusses are available that allow for living space in the roof.
It allows the roofs to be factory manufactured off-site.
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On Jan 2, 5:34 pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I am glad to see that you have just overturned over a 100 years of construction practices. Too bad taht 2 ourt of three of your reasons are wrong.
Harry K
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On 1/2/2013 7:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Truss roof design helps to keep ice dams from forming. As you asked about in another post. If your father had a modern roof he wouldn't have had the ice dam problem.
Trusses sit higher above the outside walls allowing a full layer of insulation around the perimeter of the building and good sized openings for attic ventilation. Adequate ventilation will keep the attic much cooler in the summer helping to keep A/C costs down and increase the life of shingles.
Figure in the carpentry cost to stick frame a roof and trusses are cheaper.
I built my house with trusses. There are no interior supporting walls. All the weight is supported by the outside walls. I could remove the inside walls and rebuild a new interior if I wanted to.
Trusses can be designed to allow for attic space. Half of my house is under a cathedral ceiling built from parallel chord trusses. Those trusses could enclose an attic. Trusses come in an almost unlimited variety of designs. Had you taken a moment to Google you would have found this out for yourself.
This is the sort if information known by anyone in the building industry. It's part of the education one gets by working for a living. It's not the sort of thing one gets sitting in front of a computer surfing the internet all day.
LdB
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On Wednesday, January 2, 2013 8:34:21 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Take your argument and say the exact opposite. Then you will understand.
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