Why are trusses being used in homes

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On 1/3/2013 8:38 AM, Tim Watts wrote:

As for the truss itself, there's no question they'll outperform anything stick-built onsite w/ less material and lower cost unless there is far more material and time invested.
I'm certain Code there will have near-equivalent reqm'ts as does that of NA.
If they're under-spec'ed (and a builder can get away w/ it for lack of proper Code enforcement or are poorly installed, that's entirely different problem)
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It's not that the builders are lazy or incompetent, it's just good business sense. It's more efficient to have them built in a factory in controlled environment, Most of the time, attic space aren't engineered for loft use anyway, even though many people think they can put some plywood down and built some knee walls and move in. Then they complain about the below ceiling sagging.
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wrote:
- SNIP-

Agree. The "local workmanship" around here framed our house thinking that somehow we wanted garage doors that were only 3 feet high. After the builder fixed that -- wasting time and a lot of wood, I was glad to see the prefabricated trusses and other structural parts arrive.
I'll throw in another reason to use prefab trusses as well. As I visited several "independent living" retirement communities with a relative contemplating moving into one with detached homes, we were surprised to find the management very willing, at no extra charge, to tear out walls and partitions to suit whatever living style was wanted. The single-story homes had no attics and with truss construction could be remodeled easily into different floor plans including one large kitchen-dining-living room. Some units were being changed every 5 years or so.
Tomsic
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Doug wrote:

Hi, That is true but still it depends on experienced trades people. There are many poorly slapped together houses flooding the market. Always buyer beware like every thing else. I always had my houses custom built per my specs. 7 times in my life time including one 4 season cabin in the woods.
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On Thursday 03 January 2013 17:14 Steve B wrote in alt.home.repair:

I guess a lot comes down to the roof angle too.
If you have a 40 degree pitch as I do on a 8x12m building, then it is begging for a loft conversion. Though, these days, you might as well build that in from the get-go - as someone said, if you can get engineered trusses with big cuboid spaces built in, then why not...
If you have a 20 degree (or less) roof, no-one is likely to do very much in the roof space...
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wrote:

You point out the only real drawback of trussed roofs; floor loading. They're designed for roof loading, not for heavy objects placed in the attic. At higher pitches I don't thing they make as much economic sense, either, since the materials costs go up. I don't see a lot of trusses above 6:12, or so. For some reason every newer house around here, and where I used to live has high pitched roofs (my last house was 15:12). I was told it was code but that explanation doesn't make much sense in areas where there is no snow and hurricane remnants aren't all that unusual.
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I have seen trusses for high pitched roofs. Their big problem is transportation because they are so tall. The ones I have seen used were made in two parts to keep them under the maximum height for vehicles. The first part spans the building, and the second part fits on top to create the peak.
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wrote:

Oh, I've seen them, but they're rare. Yes, I've seen manufactured houses that basically do the same thing; hinge the peak over to make the maximum height (or hinge both roof sides and lift the center into place).
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On 1/2/2013 8:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

In all the replies this was not mentioned. With trusses, heating ducts, etc. can be run perpendicular to the truss itself ... not so with solid joists. This makes the room below without bulkheads to house that stuff. In my house it uses trusses over the basement. The basement ceiling is totally flat. So if someone wanted to finish a basement room, it would work out well.
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On Thursday 03 January 2013 13:23 Art Todesco wrote in alt.home.repair:

Did you mean "engineered joists" rather that "trusses" which implies "roof trusses"?
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On 1/3/2013 8:02 AM, Tim Watts wrote: ...

Not necessarily...they're commonly also called "floor trusses"...
<http://www.trusssystemsinc.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&idH&ItemidV
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On Thursday 03 January 2013 14:30 dpb wrote in alt.home.repair:

<http://www.trusssystemsinc.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&idH&ItemidV
Fairy'nuff - we'd usually call those "engineered" but it was what I was thinking of. I have no objection to those and it does avoid plumber hacking bloody great notches in them.
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On 1/3/2013 8:39 AM, Tim Watts wrote:

...
Well, of course they're engineered but a truss is still a truss whether it's flat or peaked or whatever-shaped to fit the need...it's the principle of using the diagonal member to take the load and provide the stiffness in lieu of solid material that's the key here, not the shape or the purpose.
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Ah, now I get it.
Harry K
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But it only makes sense to use them in the spring. I quote from the website:
"Why have they become so popular lately? There are numerous answers to this question, how ever, the most important are the may cost saving benefits."
If they only save money in May, that really puts them at a disadvantage to other building methods.
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More commonly "web joists" for that style.
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On 1/3/2013 12:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

Web joists aren't trusses which is why they're called "web" joists--not trusses.
The point is/was that "truss" by itself doesn't necessarily imply only a roof truss as was stated in the post to which I responded.
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As the OP, my question was about Trusses, not floor joists, or Web joists. I'd consider trusses, but no way would I use those joists that are particle board with a 2x3 on the top and bottom. I'm not sure what they are called, but I'll avoid them. Particle board is just not real sturdy, and if the toilet overflows, what happens to those things when they get wet.
Web joists are another matter. I have seen them used in commercial buildings. They look sturdy, but in a house, they would consume a lot of space, so a standard 8 foot wall, would end up being 10 feet.
However, this is not part of my original question about roof trusses.
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On 1/3/2013 10:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:
...

The joists that are "are particle board with a 2x3 on the top and bottom" _are_ web joists. Perhaps you're leaving out the "open" in "open web" but that makes them structurally a truss as outlined in another posting that outlines the difference between the two design forms of a lightweight structure to support a load over a span. As noted therein, the truss accomplishes it by causing a set of members to act in (nearly) pure tension/compression w/o any significant bending forces whereas the other uses a (constrained) solid web to provide the resistance against bending stresses.
That the risk from failure of a structure owing to a plumbing leak causing a failure of a web joist is pretty well demonstrated by there not being in wave of such occurrences.
As for the height, there's always a tradeoff--there is no free lunch. As compensation for the higher wall height as another noted there's the payback of an unobstructed ceiling w/o dropdown duct chases and the like for finished basements/lower floors as a payback. Whether that is or isn't sufficient benefit in your mind it certainly is in many. I'll comment that I like it very much in the house in TN altho it was a purchased on-spec house and hadn't thought about it to any extent (as in at all) before and it wasn't a real factor in the decision to purchase. But, it was _very_ handy when finishing the remainder of the basement for pulling additional wiring/plumbing runs, etc., and the plain ceilings were also a plus.
--
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??? Somehow I don't picture that unless you mean running them _through_ the bottom chord.
Harry K
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