Why are trusses being used in homes

Page 2 of 5  
On 1/2/2013 10:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In Halton I notice alot of floor joists made from engineered plywood but I don't always see caps on/in them. Seen this in a couple of over million dollar homes from the basement side. Maybe I missed the caps.
Owners of over million dollar house don't like a common man studying new construction techniques of their homes too closely...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Without the "caps", how are they held in place? How does the decking attach to the joists? They just have 3/4" ply standing on edge? Really?

"Anyone can build a bridge than can stand. It takes an engineer to build a bridge that barely stands." ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hench wrote:

No caps? How? One of my son's buddy is engineer in charge at a local plant where they produce trusses and so called silent floor joists, laminated micro beams. I can't see how they can make the joist w/o caps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Tony, I haven't read too much in this thread yet but what do you mean by caps? Do you mean essentially the top and bottom flanges? If so, I agree with you. These flanges are made to take tension and compression while the web is for shear forces.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not sure what the original poster means by "caps". I would assume he means the upper and lower flanges on truss joists. These usually have a thick flange at the top and bottom (where most of the stresses are), and a thin plywood web in between. Basically a wood I-beam.
If there are no flanges, he may be looking at LVL's (Laminated Veneer Lumber). These are usually the same thickness as standard dimensional lumber. For example, an LVL joist might be 1-1/2" thick, compared to the 3/4" web on a truss joist.
LVL's are common for building beams and headers, but would work great for joists too if the price were right. LVL's are straighter, stronger, and more stable than standard lumber.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 4 Jan 2013 16:13:05 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Engineered PLYWOOD would likely be LVL beams - which can have lglued up cores (think fingerjoint) with basically thin plywood skins, or be oriented grain ply.

You read it right. In aircraft building parlance they are "spar caps" on a spar, and "web caps" on a rib

Asd well as being able to be made from young growth or scrap wood - making them much more efficient use of natural resources.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

have caps of some sort.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 3, 1:13pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1 And how would you attach to it without wood caps? If you used it for floor joists for example? You can't put screws or nails into the side of OSB.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 3 Jan 2013 11:17:29 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

That's a problem I just found - staples are even worse. Running Romex along engineered joists isn't fun. I've been attaching 1x3s to the joists, screwing them in from the opposite side, as running boards.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 19:34:21 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Aside from the other replies I read, I'd say overall better workmanship and more uniformity in measurements.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug wrote:

I think that is just a sign of modern builders being lazy or incompetant.
My house (1950's) has excellent regularity in the original framing work. Unlike the loft conversion that was done in the 1970's by a moron with a hammer.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"She got her looks from her father. He's a plastic surgeon."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2013 3:18 AM, Tim Watts wrote:

New housing has become a volume business. Build dozens if not hundreds of houses at one time using methods that a car manufacturer or a fast food restaurant would use...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True, when my wife was building houses, she had 16-20 at a time with a cycle time of about 14-16weeks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm not surprised and I was referring to more modern housing. I've seen some modern wood construction in home building that made me glad I wasn't buying that home. I also know a good carpenter that almost got fired because he couldn't make a quota on hanging front doors and it wasn't due to lack of knowledge. Personally I love really old homes circa early 1900s tho I do recognize that some aspects of construction have improved, if DONE PROPERLY.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/3/2013 7:40 AM, Doug wrote:

is true that the ones that are still around were well built, but the ones that aren't around may have been poorly built. You have to figure out what the average was. I'm sure that there were homes built back then that were junk from the start particularly small homes. When I was young we were renters and we lived in some houses that were basically shacks with pretensions. You haven't lived until you have lived in a house with single wall construction. The only thing keeping out the wind is the wall paper.
Bill Gill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My aunts lived in one built around 1880's near Utica, NY and it still survives but a lot of this has to do with normal maintenance. I can't say how many are still around but I would say even a well built one won't be around without normal maintenance. I suppose even back then you had good and bad construction tho I'm no expert on this era of home building.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If by lazy, you mean being able to build a quality product for less money, then yes. Modern trusses are mass produced. The material and labor to install them is less, not more. And, yes, as someone else said, the installation is more like to go smoothly even if some of the workers are "incompetant" as you say.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday 03 January 2013 14:23 Pat wrote in alt.home.repair:

I dispute your use of "quality".
If you said "just adequate", I would agree.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

side of the pond are quality trusses, in most cases.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday 03 January 2013 18:22 snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in alt.home.repair:

You can usually rely on the english to be half arsed these days, sadly. It's very depressing. That's why I buy german tools and appliances...
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.