Why are trusses being used in homes

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Seems that every new house I see being built today are using trusses for the roof. I dont understand the reasoning to that. Trusses are great for large commercial buildings and barns, because they eliminate the need for posts, but why are they being used on smaller homes, which have walls under them and eliminate the need for using a truss?
Three reasons come to mind to NOT use them. 1. More lumber is needed to make a truss 2. It costs more than just using lumber 3. There is no usable attic in those homes.
In stick built homes, the attic could be turned into a nice living space. You can not do that with a truss roof. So, the attic is useless other than a place to store stuff in between all the braces.
It just seems senseless to use them on a small home. Besides eliminating a useful attic, the cost to build would be significantly increased. Not just the cost to manufacture the trusses, but also the cost to install them, because a crane is needed to get them on top of the house, and a crew of men to install them. Framing a roof with plain dimentional lumber is so much easier, as well as cheaper and one gets a useful attic to boot..... One person can frame a roof by themselves and no crane is needed. WTF?
I have yet to find any GOOD reason to use them on a house!
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On 1/2/2013 7:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

...
Both of those are wrong and it's the "why"...as well as the time factor of not having to stick-build on site but simply set the truss in place.
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On Jan 2, 7:34 pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

They permit the use of wide, unsupported areas on the main floor, which is necessary for the open concept homes that are currently in vogue
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wrote:

Yep, The addition I put on my very small house is 18'x30' with the trusses spanning the 30' dimension (needed to match the existing roof).
Yes, trusses are cheaper both in the lumber used, time to build and time to erect. They do not need a "crew to erect other than the carpenters alrady on scene plus the truck driver to operate the trucks crane (part of the delivery cost.
Harry K
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On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 19:34:21 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Trusses use smaller lumber because the truss reduces unsupported spans and provides good bracing. Overall it can actually use LESS lumber - and at the very least, cheaper lumber.

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On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 19:34:21 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Trusses come with engineering that you need in a lot of places They also require a lot less on site carpenter skill and lower labor cost. I wouldn't bet most of the kids today could cut a rafter. They are much faster to do. I am not even sure they use more lumber since trusses are 2x4s and rafters are usually 2x6 or 2x8s with 2x6 joists.
The crane is chump change compared to the labor of laying out, cutting and setting rafters.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

My English house, built in the 1950's uses 2x4 rafters with purlins at the halfway point - and a centre load bearing wall. Hardly extravagent with timber volumes.
Mind you, timber was better back then - I can walk on the old ceiling rafters with no noticeable deflection over a 3.8m span.
Trusses are cheap in that they are banged out at the factory and need little skill onsite, other than a bloke who can space them evenly and nailgun a few diagonal braces across them to keep them upright.
But I agree - hideous things. Any future loft conversion involves rediculous amounts of work.
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On 1/2/2013 8:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I am always amazed at the efficiency when I drive by new construction and I see a crane setting up and a load of trusses and a finished roof later in the day.
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wrote:

The just built a Gander Mountain store near where I used to live. It's probably about 50Kft^2. It took them about two months from breaking ground to store opening. I only saw the place on the weekends when I was back there but the progress was stunning.
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Not only that.The ones I saw completed the roof on the ground including laying the shingles, the vents, furnace chimney and whatever else you see on a roof. No heavy shingles to carry, no dangerous falling off the roof or climbing up and down a ladder. Once completed a crane comes around and lifts the whole finished roof onto the house where they fasten it.
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One more observation I missed. Once the roof was on the workers could finish the rest of the house sheltered from rain and snow. I live in Edmonton Alberta.
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On Fri, 4 Jan 2013 00:29:09 -0800 (PST), PaPa Peng

never seen it done that way, and wouldn't want to on anything more than a small cottage.
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On 1/2/2013 7:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not to mention, unless they are just monsterously big, they can be set by hand. They set 11 thirty footers with no machinery right in front of my eyes in less than 30 minutes. Four guys.
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On Sat, 05 Jan 2013 23:44:25 -0600, Steve Barker

The trusses on my addition are 29' and we set them without a crane. (literally 2 men and a boy)
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On Jan 5, 10:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yep. Mine were 30' clear span, set on roof with the little crane on the truck, erected by me, my brother and his tweener son in about 2 hours. Would have taken us all day with stick construction.
Harry K
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wrote:

Typically trusses are dropped off of a roll off trailer here. If you want a crane, that is another guy.
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On Mon, 07 Jan 2013 11:46:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Around here all the trucks have a Hiab on them. Dumping them off a roll-off would be likely to get the driver fired, or worse.
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On Mon, 07 Jan 2013 14:38:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That must be a Canada thing. They rolled off my trusses in Md too.
This is a tilt bed truck so they do get laid down fairly gently and the whole truss pack is banded in one bundle per truckload as a general rule. When I have seen broken trusses, it usually happens when they fall off the wall because someone screwed up. That is pretty rare tho..
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Hi, Almost all houses built today is pretty well assembling prefab trusses, walls, staircase, railing, cabinets, windows, etc. you name it. Simply law of economics. You can still have a post and beam custom house if you want. It will cost more and take longer to finish.
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wrote:

Up here in Canada most houses are still built "on-site" but the VAST majority use pre-engineered trusses for the roof - and quite a few use manufactured floor joists as well (plywood or aspenite web with 2X4 or 2X3 lomber cap strips. All about not requiring "old growth" lumber (2X8 and larger dimensional lumber)
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