Why are radiators made of cast iron

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Most are, in fact, closed systems.
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 02:33:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Wrong. Most hydronic systems have automatic fill valves, mostly because they need them.
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Keeping them open all the time is the way things used to be done. Accepted best practice now is to keep them closed except when it's actually necessary to add water to the system -- which is fairly rare, in a well-maintained system. If you need to keep adding water to a hydronic system, you have a leak somewhere.
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On Mar 13, 1:24pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

There's a lot of people here can't grasp the fact that oxygen in the water is not the problem. Dissimilar metals are the problem. You have in effect a battery. Electric currents are circulating in the pipework. Apart from adding anti corrosion chemicals, the other method of control is to install a "sacrificial anode", usually made of magnesium. This rots away instead of the pipe system. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacrificial_anode
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:24:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

The leak would show. Nope. Fill valves need to be left open to insure the proper pressure on the system.
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That simply isn't true. Once the system is filled and pressurized, it will remain at that pressure when the fill valve is closed -- unless there's a leak.
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 21:35:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Automatic bleeders.
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If there's no air in the system, there's nothing to bleed.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

really? aluminim oxide can be formed as a powder, which is pretty porous. never had a pinhole in copper pipe show green, and still leak?
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chaniarts wrote:

In the house I grew up in my father had to open up a wall to find a leak. A leak in a copper pipe, lot's of green. I think it went way past the point of a pinhole and couldn't seal itself anymore.
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 11:41:25 -0700, "chaniarts"

Really. Aluminum oxide is impervious to oxygen. Aluminum will only oxidize on the surface. Scratch a hunk of aluminum and it'll get shiny, for a couple of minutes.

I had a nail hole turn green and leak. The nail was on the inside. :-(
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Doug Miller wrote:

hmm. webster at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rust 1b doesn't agree with you. i think you need to take it up with them :)
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Nice try. It says "comparable coating". Copper oxide and aluminum oxide aren't even remotely similar to rust.
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On Mar 11, 9:54pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Not true. Well maybe in America where things are still primitive.
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<sigh> obviously you're not worth responding to.
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