Which Pressure switch for 4 inch well

The SquareD pressure switch for my well pump is becoming flaky, either sticking on or not coming back on. I checked Grainger for a replacement and it appears that the current switch is a commercial job SquareD 9013 GSG2, 30-50 cut off. This switch sells for 56 bucks at Graingers, while a standard model (FSG2) with the same spec is only about 18 dollars. This pump and well is now used primarily for home use, although in the past it was used for some irrigation. Do I really need the expensive commercial model or will I be OK with the standard model.
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! Jim Katz

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You could try removing the old switch and cleaning the passages that allow the pressure into the switch. You can also clean the contacts by filing them lightly with a fine, thin file (some fingernail files would work) or sandpaper.
Bob
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wrote:

I agree. The small pipe that goes to the tank is probably clogged. Thats usually all that goes wrong. But clean the contacts too.
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Hi Bob, I'm afraid that's not a realistic proposition. There is a fair amount of iron in this well and those passages are probably packed with hard scale. Considering the amount of time and effort to remove the switch, it's cheaper to buy even the more expensive commercial model, than to take it off and replace it again when the first fix fails. If I lived in a 3rd world country and the nearest replacement was months away, I would definitely do this. However, as it hasn't failed completely yet, right now I just need some info on the capability of the standard switch versus the commercial version.
Thanks,
Jim
PS Yes, I even have a genuine points file, but I suspect after one pass over those industrial grade contacts which carry 230 volts, they'd be useless. Filing points on breaker sets only worked when there were no replacements handy, it usually led to a faster demise of said breaker points.
Bob wrote:

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! Jim Katz

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Jim Katz wrote:

Well, w/ that viewpoint why even consider it when you're only talking something on the order of $35 difference?
Personally, can't imagine an installation that would be more than an hour job to replace the sample line to the switch and the info you've given and just corroborated indicates it may not be the switch itself that's at fault, anyway...
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My well also has a fair amount of iron. It took 10 minutes to pull the small tube off both nipples, blow/ream it, and put it back on.
No fussing with the pressure switch/internals/contactors required.
Given that it took 20 years, and a well downline removal/reinstall (because the injector head rusted out) to provoke this, it'll last another 20 years just fine.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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wrote:

Depends on what's more valuable to you. 10 minutes or $20 to $50. It takes 10 min at most to clean out that small pipe. Once clean it will last as long as a new switch. Both will clog in time if you got lots of rust.
As far as the cheap or expensive switch. Look at the pressure variable. If both fit your needs, both will work. Although, be sure the electrical ability (amperage) of the switch are adaquate. If the cheap one meets both the pressure adjustment and amperage, buy the cheap one. Both are likely from the same manufacturer anyhow.
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