Which kind of siding?

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Yes Alu. can dent. Also it can corrode (in Maritime climate) My neighbor replaced with vinyl. But complains it is noisy in windy conditions. He comes to our house which is 10 inch pine clapboard and marvels how much quieter it is. We stain the pine (don't paint it) about every six years and since 1970 I have replaced about 30% on one side facing the sun and the occasional board elsewhere. If I ever did a total replacement I might consider Hardi-Plank. However another neighbour has tried cement based Hardi-Plank; and has installed it on one end of his A frame summer home but has had some problems. He is currently dealing with Hardi-Plank rep because of 'flaking'. We don't know it it was just a bad batch or what?
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Yes. But it is not 'interference' in the accepted sense. Interference is for example something that radiates a signal or electrical noise that 'interferes with' the operation of other equipment. Devices such as some CFLs, light dimmers, garage door openers (especially cheap products which may, or may not, comply with FCC standards) can be the culprits. I have a shaver that makes clicking noises on our bedside radio; and it's allegedly a good brand too! Of course we bought it at Wal mart so probably made in China anyway!
Bad wiring and or a sparking motor etc can also cause interference.
It's also to try and avoid local interference is why super duper communications radios have outside antenna often supported by towers or poles. Radio amateurs for example. Very useful during some of the emergencies we have been seeing in recent years due to storms etc (Global warming anyone?)
However: Any metal completely surrounding radio/TV equipment can 'shield' it. From desired and undesired signals. That's why radios without an outside antenna often won't work inside a steel/aluminum ship, certain steel sheds, metal campers and RVs etc.
We lived in a US made house trailer at one time and the only way to get TV reception was to run an antenna outside onto a fence. Outside it worked fine even when under a foot of snow! Inside the metal enclosed living unit virtually nothing would receive the TV signal. The windows even had metal mesh fly screens which made the metal shield surrounding us virtually complete.
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Vinyl clad aluminum will dent, and careless use of ladders will cause problems. I have not had any problems with shielding from the aluminum, and run all sorts of radios in the house (ham, FM, Sirius satellite, AM, scanner, and my wireless TMobile Sidekick and other data and voice services) and have not found the aluminum siding to be a problem. The roof and glass windows are huge, electrically "transparent" apertures allowing all of the RF energy to pass through without problems.
Dark color like my chocolate brown are a problem though, and ultraviolet bleaching from the sun eventually makes the siding look milky and faded. The lack of warranty is not coincidental........since the manufacturers know the way their products deteriorate and why.
Smarty
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The uglyness factor is strictly personal preference. Your preference nay vary from mine, but I think vinyl looks ugly. Ny neighborhood is all 1920's houses, mixture of cedar clapboards, cedar shakes, and stucco. Some people get tired of the maintenace of cedar siding, so they cover it with stucco. Some people may argue that vinyl looks OK, but it certainly looks out of place in my neighborhood.
People say vinyl and aluminum are "maintenance free". I prefer to think of them as "unmaintainable". It gets dmamaged and you are often SOL. Yes, you just wash down the vinyl or aluminum siding every year or two, but once it gets damaged, often you are out of luck because you can't find a matching replacement. They don't make the same vinyl patterns for 100 years in a row. Around here, we get windstorms every few years, and it is common to see large pieces of vinyl siding missing from houses. Doesn't happen to my cedar. We also get ice storms occassionally, last big one a tree came down and hit the side of our house. All I did was replace a couple clapboards (exact match to the 80 year old stuff easily obtainable), and then paint that section of wall. If I had vinyl or aluminum, I probably would have had to do an extensive search for an approximate match, and even then probably would have had to replace the whole section of that wall.
Yes, you do have to maintain cedar. Around here, everybody paints it, and once you paint then you have to continue to paint rather than stain. If my house hadn't been painted way back than, I would much prefer stain. Prep work would be minimized, and then you would apply a stain every 5-10 years. In New England, the standard seems to be let cedar shakes weather naturally. Lifetime seems to be 100+ years, way longer than any viinyl siding job will ever last. This is as long as you like the effect of weathered gray cedar shakes.
Cost of cedar will be much greater than vinyl or aluminum.
No first hand experience with cement siding, but I believe it does a decent job of combining all the best attributes of wood vs. vinyl or aluminum. As long as you like the look of cement siding. I have the impression it lasts forever, replacements should hopefully be available 20+ years after you originally install the siding so that you can repair damage. Holds paint well, so you don't have to paint all the time.
If you have environmental concerns, cedar is a renewable resource, however it comes from cutting old growth forests. Vinyl is a petroleum product. Aluminum is recyclable. Cement is probably the best overall because it is a mineral that is not in short supply, and it last a long time.
Ken
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Agreed. I still have some of the original clapboards on sections of my house, which was built before 1850. Five years ago an old farm was subdivided down the road, and four new houses were built. They were all different styles, and colors, but all used vinyl siding. The white one hasn't faded, but there are vertical stains near one window which look like rust. I don't know what it is, but I know they've had the house washed and the stains remain. The other three are very faded, with the blue one looking particularly awful. My clapboard paint job lasts for 10 years. Can't say that about the vinyl I've seen, which starts looking awful in about three years. However, I am firmly in the "all vinyl/aluminum/non-wood clapboards look hideous" camp, so YMMV.
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<h> wrote in message

"Some" vinyl looks cheap and does not hold up well long term. Quality vinyl does. I wonder how many houses you've seen with good vinyl on it and thought it was some other material.
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I like steel siding and roofing. It has that agricultural look that might be called ugly but I bet it out-performs any other material in any category except appearance. Cost per year of use. Ease of installation. Zero mainentance. Last longer and has more colors than vinyl. That's why they use it on barns, it's the best.
I see more often steel used in residential areas at least on roofs anyway. I'm sure steel siding just wouldn't fit in some neighorhoods, hehe, but it seems to be used more often than in the past.
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metal kills cell signals in homes, dents pretty easily, neighborhood homes have had to be painted at around the 30 year mark the paint literally wears away.......
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Bob
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Steel holds paint better than most materials. A 30 years paint job is far longer service than any other painted material. A new paint job would not last 30 years but still a much longer time than anything else you can buy.
Steel is so durable that you could ignore the paint and it would last another 30 years. Farmers never paint it. They just intall it and forget about it. Steel siding and roofing are so durable they will easily outlast the owner unless you are very young. I have seen steel with rust but never have I seen it rusted all the way through. In any case, I already excluded steel from the category of appearance for the purpose of making my point. Steel is the best in every category except appearance.
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Most houses have a land line. 30 years is a long time. What does vinyl look like after 30 years? Many have to go ahead and have to paint it anyway.
Sure it can be dented but the same blow would put a permanent hole in vinyl. No way is vinyl more durable than steel. Vinyl may last forever but you will get rid of it since long before that since it will become so brittle that it will be literally be falling apart . When you are done with vinyl it goes to the landfill. Steel can be recyled and used steel is worth real money at a scrap yard. You can't name another siding product that is still worth money after it replaced.
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