Where to mount outlet for Jacuzzi tub

I am ready to run a new circuit for the Jacuzzi tub I put in. I am running the circuit it under the floor and coming up from the bottom into the motor area.
https://picasaweb.google.com/mikerock92/September242011?authuser=0&feat=directlink
The easiest thing for me to do is mount the box directly to the floor, and having the outlet face up. Any issues with doing this?
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On 9/24/2011 5:12 PM, Mikepier wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/mikerock92/September242011?authuser=0&feat=directlink
Typically, I run a 2 circuit cable to the area under the tub, and install 2 gfci outlets on whatever framing I can find just inside the access panel. If the tub doesn't have a heater, a single circuit will suffice. I would probably not mount it flat, face up, but it should be legal, if you must.
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There's no heater, only the motor. But is it better to put in a GFCI breaker, so in the event it does trip, you just have to go to the breaker panel instead of the access door of the tub?
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 18:44:55 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

Sounds like a better idea to me.
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On 9/24/2011 9:44 PM, Mikepier wrote:

I tend to keep GFCI protection as close to the point of use as possible. In the event that the GFCI trips, you'll probably need to get into the tub access to find out why.
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*Like RBM I usually run two 20 amp circuits for the hydromassage bathtub. There is not always a lot of space for servicing the motor if needed, so I usually mount the receptacles flush with the back wall studs. In your case it looks like you have a block wall there which would be difficult to drill into from an angle. I would not put the receptacle face up so dust or moisture could not settle on top and work its way down into the slots.
Instead of putting the GFI's under the tub, I usually mount GFI switches somewhere else in the bathroom such as inside of a closet or behind the door or at the countertop with the countertop receptacle. A GFI breaker will work as well, however Article 680.71 states that the tub must be protected by "A readily accessible ground fault circuit interrupter".
I advise my customers to install a heater which will maintain the water temperature. Otherwise all of that water churning around will cool down real fast.
I could not tell from your photos if there was a bonding lug on the motor. If so than you need to bond the motor with a #8 solid copper wire to the nearest waterpipe. I usually install the bond wire regardless because I once had an inspector insist that it be installed even though there was no lug. I think I loosened a bolt and put a lug on it just to pass inspection. When I bond the other end I clamp to the hot, cold and shower pipes even though they should all be bonded together already.
If you have a 2011 code book, check out article 680.74. There is a change for 2011 which seems to require that the #8 be installed regardless of the type of motor: "The 8 AWG or larger solid copper bonding jumper shall be long enough to terminate on a replacement non-double-insulated pump motor and shall be terminated to the equipment grounding conductor of the branch circuit of the motor when a double-insulated circulating pump is used". Since NJ has not adopted the 2011 code yet, I don't know what is an acceptable method of connecting the bond wire to the grounding conductor. Maybe add a copper lug to the outside of a metal box and bring the #8 through it and leave a tail out for a future motor replacement.
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Thanks for the heads up on the grounding.
So where does the ground need to be run to, the panel, or the cold water pipe in the bathroom?
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On Mon, 26 Sep 2011 05:30:47 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

The 8 gauge is a bonding conductor that is just to bond all metal around the tub to the grounding lug of all attached electrical equipment. If you have metal water pipes you will be bonding them but if your house is plumbed in plastic it is not necessary to take the 8 ga back to a grounding bus bar. That path will already exist in the pump supply ground tho.
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On Sep 26, 12:09pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The plumbing is copper. But am I allowed to bury the pipe clamp inside the wall? Does it need to be accessible?
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On Mon, 26 Sep 2011 09:19:41 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

It should be accessible.
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The plumbing is copper. But am I allowed to bury the pipe clamp inside the wall? Does it need to be accessible?
*I have never made mine accessible and they passed inspection. Of course the inspector saw them before the wall was closed up. You may want to make sure your hot to cold bonding jumper is in place at the water heater or other location just in case the inspector wants to take a look.
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This is in a condo, so I'm not sure if I can even go that far. But as far as grounding to a pipe, right below is a vacant office that has an access door in the ceiling for the water valves. I could just run the copper bond to there to make it accessible.
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Your link does not work
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wrote:

Sorry,should work now.
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 14:12:58 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

There are inspectors who do not like face up receptacles, no matter what. It would look better if you could mount the box on a versicle surface Even if it was just a 2x4 tombstone right there. (Make an "L" with one flat, nailed on back of the one standing up)
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On Sep 24, 8:34pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I did not think of that. Thanks. Maybe thats what I'll do.
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I suspect your local codes address it-- but in my area there has to be a GFCI breaker in sight of and within [10?] so many feet of a water feature that people use.
Even if there were no codes, it just seems like a good idea.
Jim
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Mike,
I put what looks like the same model in our main bathroom last year. The instructions said to mount the outlet vertically so many inches (4-6"?) above the floor. You could do that against the block wall or on the wall at the foot of the tub. I put a couple of GFCI switches mounted in a closet at the foot of the tub and used a regular outlet. You could probably put your GFCI switch on the outside of the wall at the foot of the tub for easy access for the recommended monthly testing.
I bonded the motor to a copper pipe. I popped for the water heater option and my wife loves it. It required a second 20 amp circuit but was easy to install. Better than getting her a piece of jewelry. She still uses it several times a week.
I also did the optional mortar bed under the tub. The floor was level, but the tub was not, so I fixed that with some shims on the feet. It was kind of fussy working with the mortar and the tub feet, but it is rock solid with no flex.
I hope it holds up, because I dread having to fix or replace it.
Good luck.
dss
.
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