Where to find replacement asbestos siding

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I need about 22 of them. 32" wide, 14" exposed to weather, thickness 1/8-3/16" (the vertical groove pattern accounts for the varying thickness). If I can find a fiber-cement replacement 32" wide, they would be okay if the pattern matches what I have.
Thanks,
Ray
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Going to be tough, probably -- the asbestos replacements would have to be salvaged from somewhere and matching an old pattern closely is often impossible.
Would probably help to post a picture somewhere of what you've got. Depending on where you are, the salvage/restoration kind of folks may be best bet for the old stuff although not sure anybody is trying (or even allowed?) to salvage the asbestos siding...
Also depending on what you actually have, I have a supply of the asbestos siding shingles I've salvaged from various outbuildings and saved for repair or perhaps re-use. I could spare roughly that many but these are only 16" wide, not 32". Don't recall the overlap/ exposure, I'd guess it's about the same...
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Shipping them is going to be your problem. I wonder what percent will break in transit. And say they are concrete tiles, not asbestos, or the shipper will freak out.
I agree that salvage is the best option. I think the OP should look for falling down buildings and ask the owners. Or ask a siding contractor to "acquire" some.
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dpb wrote:

I just posted a photo in alt.binaries.test. Subject: Sample asbestos shingle. Time 1:28, 5/8/2007. I should have mentioned that all the shingles needing replacement are in the bottom course. (Careless lawn maintenance people and landscapers.) They are mainly chipped, like you see in the photo at the left bottom corner.
I live in central N.J.
Thanks,
Ray

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I recommend that you run a piece of 1x4 along the bottom. That's my standard solution for clients who don't like the cost of replacing siding. If the wood is properly primed, caulked, and painted, it will last for years, though not as long as cementitious shingles. When if fails, it's easy to replace. Use cedar with the smooth side out for longer life.
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Steve wrote:

Steve,
Sounds like a great idea, especially since the damaged ones are the inconspicuous ones along the sides and back of the house and do not face the street or entry. Do you bevel the top, to improve water runoff, or just rely on the bead of caulk? I'd have to predrill the asbestos shingles every so often, right?
Could a J-channel that's normally used at the bottom of a vinyl siding job serve the same purpose? One problem might be color if I tried painting vinyl, but factory white would be acceptable. Yes, I know of vinyl's shortcomings: brittleness over time, fading, etc.
Ray
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I've never seen it beveled, but it wouldn't hurt.
As a second thought, use HardiTrim and it will never rot.
I suspect that making the J-channel look right would be difficult. It might be obviously something just stapled on.
Yes, I'd pre-drill the asbestos shingles -- no sense breaking them more.
As an alternative, you can put them on with construction adhesive. You might HAVE to do it that way if there's no wood behind the shingle where you need the fastener.
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Steve wrote:

Steve,
My handyman assistant is coming over in a couple of hours. I'll discuss your great ideas with him. Many thanks.
Ray
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Here I go following up to my own post.
I mentioned this to my dad over the weekend. He has a house with asbestos siding.
His solution: Remove the chipped shingle, turn it over, drill new holes, and nail it back on. The chipped edge will be hidden by the course above.
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How to get it out w/o breaking it entirely is the trick??? Plus, how to renail it unless do so below the line of the course above?
I'd surely like to know the way in which he accomplished this. I have several buildings of the type and salvaged a large number from the old barn when we restored it (no longer running the corrals directly against that side of the barn so reverted to the original wood siding the shingles were put on to protect) and would love to use some of them to repair the existing but hadn't figured out a practical way to do it w/o essentially starting over.
Of course, the "turn them upside down" trick doesn't work for the wavy bottom pattern which these are, but I have plenty of new ones to use for the repairs...
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The tools for putting slate on a roof should work just as well in this application.
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I've never had the fortune to work on a slate roof. I have a pretty good idea how it is done on new work, but no real clue how one would manage to repair/replace an existing one??? (Which, I gather would at least be somewhat similar in that it is an overlapping, hidden fastener, brittle material which is why the comparison).
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The general technique is that you slide a skinny thing under the slate to cut the nails holding it in, and while the slate is out, you insert a hook between (Or, if necessary, through) the slates that will be under the new one the hook grabs the lower edge of the new peice, and the slates/shingles around it keep it from shifting sideways.
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OK, step one I can get, thanks... Now --
What magic makes the hook the right length for the bottom of the new tile to be in line w/ the proper course yet allow the new tile to be under the course above? (Inquiring minds want to know....) :)
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wrote:

Any reason not to just patch the corners with bondo, then?
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Bondo is about the worst thing to patch anything exposed to weather - it draws moisture like you wouldn't believe. I don't even like using it on a car, if I can avoid it.
nate
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I'm not sure of the available sizes off hand, but Home Depot sells a product that can be painted to match the old asbestos siding.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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Try to look up the May 2007 issue of Journal of Light Construction magazine. Page 38 shows how to do this using HardiePanel cut to closely match the asbestos siding.
Bruce
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Bruce Boyd wrote:

Bruce,
Thanks for the lead to a clever idea. Here's the article:
http://www.jlconline.com/cgi-bin/jlconline.storefront/464140100013362f27187f000001050e/UserTemplate/82?sF4140100013362f27187f000001050e&c b17577d9b579c5018d5a8c992efc14&p=1
Ray
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