What would you use to seal this crack in a homemade manzanita walking stick?

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Macadam is a premix and is hot spread and rolled. Chip #1 and #2 is oil and spread of chip rock. Dry rock is spread on top or onto the old surface with hot oil tar sprayed on top or on the pavement. Martin
On 4/1/2015 4:44 PM, Markem wrote:

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Technically, "macadam" is just a crushed rock surface. If tar is added then it's "tarmac".
In modern usage, tho, "macadam" and "tarmac" have become synonomous, since no-one uses plain crushed rock any more (pneumatic tires tend to pull crushed rock apart, whereas steel wheels and horseshoes compacted it further; hence the replacement of macadam with tarmac following the advent of the automobile).
John
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I have crushed rock in my long driveway. All limestone. It flattens out as the weight of tires crush it into place. The small chunks and dust glue the mass together.
I can eat it up with my tractor tires, to much weight on thin ridges that are designed to fit into the ground/mud.
I had granite in the front 600' - it was never put in correctly and is just sinking into the mud. If a pre-mix of fine dust and crushed granite is laid down first - sinks in and forms a solid base, then the rock is added to that stable base.
My driveway is 1400' to the house. Another 12-14 around two buildings and back out the the main driveway. That second section is slowly taking place.
Martin
On 4/2/2015 9:44 AM, John McCoy wrote:

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We did the same in Santa Cruz mountains - we tried it ONCE with the oil on top and went back to oil on the bottom! Our area was all private roads as was Hwy 9 in the 50's.
Martin
On 4/1/2015 3:22 PM, Danny D. wrote:

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Martin Eastburn wrote, on Wed, 01 Apr 2015 22:51:54 -0500:

What they seem to do here, in the Santa Cruz mountains, today, anyway, is spread the gloop first, and then put the rocks on top, and then sweep the loose rocks away.
The rocks ping against the cars for weeks thereafter, sometimes months, depending on the road use.
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but will not grip as well. A lot depends on how and where you use it - if you tend to drag the stick over rough concrete or twist it when you put weight on it, it won't last very long. etc.
That said, different brands of cane and crutch tips wear differently - and there's no readily disernable differences in the tips themselves.
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Danny D.-
You may find a tip that lasts longer, but it may have a problem slipping.
How does the tip fail? Does the metal sleeve cut through? If so, look at smoothing the bottom of the sleeve and putting a fiber washer under it as a buffer.
At the handle end, would something like a bicycle handlebar grip work? What about another rubber tip without the metal sleeve?
Fred
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Fred McKenzie wrote, on Tue, 31 Mar 2015 11:50:27 -0400:

I think a wine cork tip will fail within a week, but, the rubber cork stoppers that we used in chemistry class may last longer, if I can find them in cheap bulk quantities.

The metal sleeve is brand new (just put on Monday, only yesterday.) What happened before was that the rubber tips wore thin from being used on hikes by the wife. They holed in about a month (often less time than that). I usually left them on for another few weeks, as they still afforded some protection to the wood tip end for a while longer, even when holed.
The metal tip was to prevent wear to the wood, as the stick still works even as a wooden stick. The problem is that it will crack and break over time, so, the point was to put the metal to protect the end, and to make a uniform size for the rubber tip.

A bicycle grip might work. The wife changes hand position, so, it's probably best not to put any grip. The whole point was to enjoy the wood, but, unfortunately, it cracked from being stored in the house, I guess (very dry here in California these past few years).
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Danny D.-
I found rubber stoppers at Ace Hardware next to their O-Rings.
Fred
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"Danny D." wrote:

Epoxy and micro-balloons.
1) Open up the crack by removing ALL the failed items you have tried. You need a clean rough surface.
2) Mix up some slow epoxy and wet out all the cleaned surfaces with epoxy.
3) Take the remaining mixed epoxy and add micro-balloons mixing as you go until you have a mixture the consistency of mayonnaise. Using a paint mixing stick or equal, apply thickened epoxy as req'd to fill crack completely allowing 10% overfill.
4) Allow to cure 2-3 days, then sand smooth.
5) Wet out a piece of leather and wrap the repair.
No suggestions for tip.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote, on Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:28:08 -0700:

One problem I failed to mention is that sanding is out of the question simply because the allure of the manzanita is the thin dark bark (which the wife loves as it's one of her favorite woods).
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8747/16798769859_66e9574fa2_c.jpg
Googling what a "micro-balloon" is ... I see they're a fine glass powder. http://www.ipmsstockholm.org/magazine/2004/02/stuff_eng_tech_microballoons.htm
Can you buy them at the big box stores?
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"Danny D." wrote:
Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Danny D." wrote:

Sand off the excess epoxy putty, not the wood.
BTW, if you cover the repair with leather, you don't have tom be so careful how you sand. ---------------------------------------------------- "Danny D." wrote:

Definitely NOT, you need to find a fiberglass supplier.
Got a boat builder in your area?
There used to be a couple of major yacht builders in Sweden.
Lew
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My first choice would be a new cane. Maybe you could use a heavy-duty band clamp. Maybe 5-minute epoxy. Another possibility might be to epoxy in a steel shaft coming up from the bottom.
But I'm not sure any repair is realistic. A cane is something you need to depend on. One collapse could be very dangerous. If it were me I'd sacrifice the aesthetic appeal of the home made cane and just make sure I had a strong one.
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Mayayana wrote, on Wed, 01 Apr 2015 08:50:15 -0400:

But that's the whole point!
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email.me:

Maybe put a tennis ball over the end when going for a long walk on rough surfaces? Then it can be removed for indoor use, or other situations where appearance is important.
John
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On Mon, 30 Mar 2015 20:37:15 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Do the same thing you do to seal your wife's crack :)
Sorry, I could not resist the urge to reply to this....
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