What would you use to seal this crack in a homemade manzanita walking stick?

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What would you use to seal this crack in a manzanita walking stick?
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8736/16794473748_4b0ee6cc2d_c.jpg
Would you just cover the crack with a wrap of leather string instead?
BTW, I tried Elmers white glue (with sawdust) which just shrank.
I tried Durham's Water Putty, but, putty is not a glue, and it just fell out as the stick flexed over time (it's what my wife uses on hikes). Note: The business end of the home-made manzanita walking stick worked out much better than the hand-holding end.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8752/16774811977_b846f72bc2_c.jpg
For that tip, I bought a steel sleeve, & a rubber chair leg protector:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8689/16794734360_1797bb2f0e_c.jpg
The rubber doesn't last long; but the wife likes it (so I keep replacing it). If there's a better idea than rubber chair leg protectors, let me know.
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Danny D. wrote:

I would use Epoxy with a half-drop of black dye mixed in. They make crutch tips and walking cane tips. Take it to a drug store and see which fits.
--
 GW Ross 

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G. Ross wrote, on Mon, 30 Mar 2015 17:04:03 -0400:

Are they a different rubber?
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Likewise I'd use epoxy, but I'd mix sawdust in it to make a putty (and I'd skip the dye, the sawdust will darken the mixture).
John
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"John McCoy" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- Why waste quality epoxy with garbage filler?
Micro-balloons, even in small quantity, are inexpensive.
Lew
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True, but then you end up with epoxy-colored epoxy. Using sawdust or sanding dust gives you a dark color that generally looks better. And in this application the strength of the result (which is probably better with micro-balloons) isn't a concern.
John
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Danny D. wrote:

I'd go with the leather wrap , that end of the stick is not stable due to the open end grain . It moves with temp/humidity changes . Wet the leather before you wrap , as it dries it'll shrink .
--
Snag



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Mike Marlow wrote, on Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:19:22 -0400:

The cane will last forever; but the rubber tips last, oh, about a month each.
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Danny D. wrote:

When I made my cane, I used a brass ferrule and stuck in a rubber cork. They last for 3-5 years but I don't go hiking :(
If you relace the steel tip with one that is, say, 1/2 to 3/4 longer you can partially insert a rubber cork. It will last much longer, more rubber to wear. You will probably have to whittle it slightly to skinny part of the taper down.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote, on Tue, 31 Mar 2015 05:30:47 -0400:

What I like about a rubber cork is, if I choose the size wisely, that I can replace it with wine corks, which I have in abundance.
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Lee Valley part # 45K42.18 has been quite robust for me; over four years of rough trails and concrete sidewalks and the rubber tip is still ok.
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Scott Lurndal wrote, on Tue, 31 Mar 2015 19:34:03 +0000:

Is this the rubber tip?
http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/Gardening/45k4217s2.jpg
It is a bit big for the walking stick I made for the wife; but maybe I can fit a steel tip on the end, which then would fit the rubber insert.
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Mike Marlow wrote, on Tue, 31 Mar 2015 23:27:26 -0400:

Good question. This walking stick is mostly used on the roadway, but, I would think people who use canes use 'em on the roadway as well.
It gets maybe, oh, about three miles a day, which is only about 15 miles a week (roughly, given she only walks weekdays with her friends), so it lasts roughly 50 to 75 miles.
How long do canes last typically? Do they go a month at 50 to 75 miles?
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Danny D. wrote:

I don't walk that much but it has been YEARS since I changed my cane tip. But a factor as important as distance is the surface upon which it is being used...carpet/wood is one thing, a road is another.
I once spent six weeks mapping the geological structure of a mountain in Montana, lots of walking on both solid and loose stone surfaces. I shredded my first pair of heavy sole work shoes and the second pair was half way shot.
A road is not the same as a mountain but it is also not the same as "round the house".
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dadiOH wrote, on Wed, 01 Apr 2015 08:20:36 -0400:

This road isn't paved, per se. It's small rocks pressed into tar. They have a name for it, but it escapes me at the moment. When they retop it, there are bits of tar gravel for months, all over the cars. So it's a rough surface.
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chipseal
It may be rough immediately after application, but within a few days, it's as smooth as any other asphalt. I've generally not had problems with tar on the car, either; at least in San Jose.
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Scott Lurndal wrote, on Wed, 01 Apr 2015 14:13:15 +0000:

Yeah, I'm in the Santa Cruz mountains. Chip-and-seal is what they call it, you're right. The airport & roads crew comes out every few years to chip-and-seal it.
It is a bit rougher I'd say, than the asphalt on the main roads.
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On Wed, 1 Apr 2015 20:22:59 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Macadam is an east coast name.
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wrote:

And it's a street name in Portland, OR
http://tinyurl.com/qfnykej http://tinyurl.com/nn96mt6
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wrote in

---------- Oregon Public Broadcasting 7140 SW Macadam Ave Portland, OR 97219
Directions to OPB http://www.opb.org/about/directions/
--------- Johns Landing
4380, 4386, 5100, and 5550 SW Macadam Avenue Portland, OR 97239
Johns Landing is one of the leading suburban business corridors in the Portland metropolitan area, offering customers an unmatched business environment and setting with numerous restaurants, hotels, and business support services. With its eclectic variety of shops and restaurants, contemporary buildings, historic residences and upscale condominiums, Johns Landing offers neighborhood charm with urban culture.
http://tinyurl.com/q889b8g
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