What's the trick to gel stain on a fiberglass door?

It says to put on and wipe off. But wiping off doesn't leave like a smeared look but instead takes off the entire stain. What is the proper technique for this - anyone know?
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On Aug 14, 11:28 pm, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

most likely using a varnish stain and no wiping off
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I bought a new fiberglass door along with the door manufacturer's stain kit 2 years ago. When I applied the stain per their recommendation (apply, let it sit, then wipe off residual) the door kept some of the stain. I assume it had some type of adhesive or other binding ingredient. I would suggest you check with the local paint experts to see what they recommend. There must be stuff specifically formulated for doing fiberglass or other non-absorbing surfaces.
Smarty
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Smarty wrote: ...

Yeah, it's called "paint"... :)
If OP really wants to stain it instead, see the following link
http://www.masonite.com/BUILDER/Spec_pdfs/HowToStainEntryTear.pdf
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Although it actually is "paint" the stuff sold for doing fiberglass door staining I have seen is actually called "stain" regardless of what it actually contains.
Smarty

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Smarty wrote:

That was a joke...
They are heavily pigmented stains. If you'll look at the link provided, it describes the type of stains and applications to use for the application in exquisite detail.
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Sorry if I missed the humor. I did, however, read the link you provided. The description of what to use was limited to about a dozen words, saying either heavily pigmented or gel stains would work.
Smarty

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Smarty wrote:

Along w/ a detailed instruction on applying them to fiberglass doors...
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YES! Old Masters is where it's at! I was trying to figure out which brand Pella recommended for their doors (it was no longer on their website.) The only thing I could think of was "Old Village."
I had to drive quite far this weekend to get it because no place in my entire county sells that brand. Awesome product.
The only thing I can't get a straight answer on is the brush. The can says use synthetic, other people (here and elsewhere) said foam brush and the dealer said china bristle brush. I decided to try the natural china bristle brush just because I prefer those when using oil based stain, varnish and paint. It came out pretty good I must say and far exceeded my expectations.
I'll never use another brand gel stain again.
Thanks!
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The only way something will adhere to fiberglass is to use a fiberglass activator from a boat chandlery ( bare fiberglass, NO paint or primer on surface) . This reacts at the molecular level with the fiberglass and must be painted within 1 to 2 hours. Everything I am reading in this thread about staining fiberglass is freaking this old boat builder. Polyurethane one or 2 component works well on fiberglass but stain??????? This I would have to witness.
Suspicious old fart.
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I gave up on minwax gel stain. Try Old Masters brand. When I searched with google, most people found it worked well on fiberglass doors. It worked for me when minwax would not.

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See my other post. You are absolutely right about the Old Masters! Great stuff! Thanks.
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On Aug 14, 11:28 pm, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I did this several years ago on about 15 doors. The first door I did came out horrible. All the rest look great. The tricks I learned quickly were:
1. use a foam brush 2. don't go over areas you've already stained unless you do it within 30 seconds or so. Got to move quicky cause once it starts to dry and you go over it, it makes a mess. 3. don't rub it off. Make sure you put it on thin with the foam brush.
Hope that helps.
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Also practice and remove, practice and remove, repeat to a small area until you know what you are doing. But try OLd Masters gel.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/What-s-the-trick-to-gel-stain-on-a-fiberglass-door-242499-.htm jackelch wrote:
poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Check the THerma-Tru web site. A) insure that the surface has been cleaned use anything up to lacquer thinner. Then apply an oil based gel stain like Zar. Leave it on about 20 minutes so it can :STAIN: the fiberglass, then wipe off in the direction of the grain. w-mail me or if in the North TX area call me 972 399-0777 and Ill walk you through it,or stop by our showroom in Irving TX for a demo.
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On Tuesday, August 14, 2007 at 11:28:27 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The trick is to apply the gel stain the same way you would apply paint. Mak e sure you use long smooth strokes for each section so it looks unified. Do not wipe it off or try to wipe any darker areas. Brush it so it blends, th en complete a long stroke. It should look like a first coat of paint that n eeds a second coat. Let it dry overnight and it should have a rustic or dis tressed stained look. If it doesn't, then your not a good painter and you d on't have the skills or understanding to be able to follow my instructions. Remember, stained wood isn't suppose to look perfect. That's what gives st ained wood it's character.
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