What's the deal w/ steel shingles?

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aluminum shingles as opposed to special steel, painted, shingles would be lower or comparable. classicmetalroofingsystems dealer wrote that aluminum is generally more expensive than steel. my budget for this reroofing job is $10K which corresponds to $130/SQ shingles, prorated trim & $1200 freight. it was in large part a fin. decision not to pursue this avenue.

not cheap as in quality. frugal as how far a dollar spent will go. My options are: a) local roofer replacing asphalt shingles for $10K, guaranteed for 20 yrs w/ declining value. b) DIY steel shingles for $10K, guaranteed for 50yrs (at least) & maintaining value; in fact increasing the resell-value of my house.
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...so what happened in this thread? Did it die of slow death (like many others) without closure? Anybody bought (or not) these steel shingles? I am interested, but not after reading about all the hassles with distributors and sellers. Any good experience buying steel shingles out there?
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snipped-for-privacy@nobox.com (Needles Robert) says...

I installed steel shingles once. I couldn't figure out how to get the ridge cap on without bending the top row of shingles under my knees. I tried making a ridge saddle out of plywood to distribute my weight, which helped a bit, but you could still see dents from the ground. The owner was not happy. I was frustrated. It was not a good experience.
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On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 19:52:25 -0800, Larry Caldwell

roof/shingles - except the locks/seams.
Tiles, slates, shingles, shakes, etc. rest directly on the deck and shouldn't dent. Perhaps your steel shingles were the thin-steel Eurotile type?
Wouldn't it work installing the ridge cap at the same time as installing the 2 top rows (left/right side) of shingles? In other words, when you get to the top, you would be installing both top rows of shingles at the same time as installing the ridge cap so you wouldn't have to step on any of the top-row shingles?
The problem of course might be the fact that steel shingles installation starts at the bottom left corner of the roof so when you get to the top you get boxed-in and wouldn't be able to install the ridge cap until both top rows are installed.
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eBay does NOT allow wire transfers/Western Union, so report him and/or do not do business with him.
heesh, have you ever

Yep, several times, and the charges were reversed immediately. You can dispute the charges online and it takes about 2 minutes.

Yep, I regularly place orders for my business of $15,000 and up, and I order almost everything online. Just use a credit card and you'll be fine. If he won't take a card, use PayPal and your bank account. PayPal is a pitt bull if there's a problem with an eBay purchase. Relax, you're covered.
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On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 12:04:25 -0400, <h> wrote:

shingles w/o the matching trim. so, since he doesnt sell the complete assembly on ebay, the deal (assembly) needs to be completed off-line (WU/bank draft). the best scenario I see is that he delivers shingles via ebay and then I still need to look for matching accessories at whatever price elsewhere - which makes it tricky. is that the case?

at least that takes most of my doubts away
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As someone who is looking at requiring a new roof soon, I was curious about the original question being asked.
I don't intend to do my own roof. I have more than enough home-repairs and renovations, that I don't think I'll kill myself doing , to last me the next few years. So the gist (jist?) of the original post, How much more than a standard shingle roof is reasonable to spend on a metal or other "life-time" type roof. Our nieghbour across the street had one installed in one day. I didn't realize it was a metal roof going up or I would have paid more attention. I beleive they went over the old shingles, saving a heck of a lot of time (labour) and the cost of bin and disposal. To my mind that should help balance out higher material costs.
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Jeff wrote: ...

I would say that is, in all likelihood, false economy. To invest in the "high-priced spread" for the purpose of a long lifespan and then to cut corners on the installation is at complete odds with each other...
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How is installing a roof over a single layer of shingles 'cutting corners"? Especially a metal roof. From the OP's post it sounds like this may have been a conventional metal roof- not metal shingles, which may have different demands.
But, even in general, I thought it was fairly common practice, as long as the original roof was lying flat, to install a second layer of roofing over the first.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

"Common practice" isn't the same as "best practice" and particularly when using a high-end product, anything that isn't consonant with that just doesn't make sense.
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Jeff writes:

Lifetime? Bunk.
If steel lasted a "lifetime", the third world would be adorned with immaculate tin roofs.
No warranty with a contractor is worth anything a few years out.
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On Wed, 24 Oct 2007 19:14:25 -0500, Richard J Kinch

http://www.roofingcontractor.com/CDA/Archives/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000134074 also, a simple search "steel shingles" "lifetime warranty" will generate dozens upon dozens of qualified hits
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Frugal Farmer writes:

So you believe galvanized steel is going to last a lifetime?
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Umm... Many roofing materials will last a lifetime. A slate roof can last 80-100 years. At that point, you may have to pull it all off and then nail the same slate back up with new nails and flashing for the next 80-100 years of service.
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Copper and slate, yes.
Galvanized steel, no. This "lifetime roof" is the latest bunko sales swindle, a la "liquid siding". Cheap old stuff sold as something new because it comes with a (worthless) faux-warranty.
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 11:18:54 -0500, Richard J Kinch

install copper or slate shingles. the rest of us, the way average N.A. houses are built these days, will settle for the lifetime that's 50-70yrs long. beats asphalt shingles.

reroofing, will go down w/ the av. house.

past 20 yrs or being under the same ownership.
Hypothetically speaking, given the current steel shingle market conditions, what are the barriers to entry for, let's say a proprietor w/ low overhead costs selling steel online, to add steel shingles to his "repertoire", by-passing installers and retailing directly to DIYers?
Not as much manufacturers as distributors of steel shingles (just as torsion springs mfgs for garage doors) believe they are better off not retailing their product directly to the public. They believe they are maintaining higher prices for their product by restricting sales "to the trade." In other words, "We do not sell to the end user. We protect our dealers," which would seem to be prima facie evidence of an illegal restraint-of-trade scheme. But this is an old story which is true of virtually every product and service, going back to medieval guilds and before. (note: this quoted without permission)
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 11:18:54 -0500, Richard J Kinch

No, you are wrong on that point as well. 30 or 40 years years ago you might have been right. Today, steel roofing is available with extremely EXTREMELY durable coatings. For that matter, I know personally of a STEEL 1925 Ford Model T that has been sitting outside almost it's entire life and still has the original paint on it. It's not even galvanized, as far as I know. Just painted.
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What coating would that be?

And Roman pottery does too. Possibility is not likelihood.
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More ignorant nonsense from the usual suspect.
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 20:47:08 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Kynar500/Hylar5000 fluoropolymer (pvdf) covered by a 50yr warranty against environmental aging, fading, chalking, cracking, deterioration,..
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