What's a better chainsaw file than the Oregon #23727 3/16" (4.8mm) round file?

Does your chain saw only last three or four sharpenings? What's a better chainsaw file than: Oregon #23727 3/16" (4.8mm) round file
SITUATION: A few months ago, I bought a new Husqvarna 445 18" chainsaw. I bought, at the time, two Oregon #23728 round 3/16" (4.8mm) chain saw files (in addition to a depth gage and flat file). After only about three or four filings, I noticed the file slipping more easily (and not biting).
Switching to the unused file (they came in a 2 pack), I noticed the unused file bit much more than the now-used file.
TECHNIQUE: There are only 36 teeth (18 each side) on the chain; and (with a new file), it takes only four to seven swipes per tooth to sharpen. It seems to me that a chain saw file should be HARDER than the chain saw teeth, and that it should outlast the chain. Certainly it should, IMHO, get a few dozen chain sharpenings.
MY QUESTION: Q: Do you only get three or four sharpenings per file? Q: If you get more, where can I get the 'better' chainsaw file that you use?
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 15:16:47 -0800, "Fred W. James"

I don't know what your method is, but one common mistake people make when using a file is to draw it backwards while maintaining pressure on it--this dulls the teeth of the file needlessly.
--
croy

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Very rarely do I ever run into a bad file. One thing that will kill a chainsaw file is work hardened saw teeth where you hit something harder than wood and the impacts hardened the steel. The file will skate over the hard surface and not take a bite. You should be sharpening when four strokes per tooth will finish the job.
Four good sharpenings is not bad you might be able to get six if you keep the chain out of the dirt and only file on the push stroke. If you want eight sharpenings per file get in the habit of wiping the filings out of the file on your pants leg after each tooth.
A few dozen? maybe in the movies.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 15:16:47 -0800, "Fred W. James"

Once I found the chain saw stones for my Dremel tool, I stopped using a file.
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On 11/21/2011 11:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Exactly. It almost works too good to be true, but they are great.
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On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 10:45:38 -0800, "Fred W. James"

They have stones for the common cain saw teeth and they seem to last a very long time. The only time I saw one fail it was because the user got it too hot (bad for the chain and the stone). You really only need a couple second burst per tooth unless you have allowed them to be pretty much destroyed. (hit a piece of steel or a rock)
Palm trees are about the toughest thing I have seen on a chain. They draw sand up into the trunk.
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On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 18:01:49 -0800, "Fred W. James"

I find the Dremel seems easier to control and mine is variable speed. I always seemed to wobble around a bit with the file and I had a hard time getting them all the same. I had a doodad that clamped on the bar but it was a big bulky thing.
I haven't worn out a stone yet. I did see my neighbor overheat one tho. That was user error
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On Wed, 23 Nov 2011 11:02:24 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

The stone may have been slugged with pine sap.
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