What is a good temporary coating for extension cord joints

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I have outdoor livestock tanks. It's been below freezing, so I have to run tank heaters to keep the water from freezing. I run extension cords from nearly sheds. All outlets are GFCI protected, because these heaters can go bad and could kill animals. The problem is that where the heater plugs into the extension cord, it's laying on the ground outside the animal's pen (water tanks are against fence, cord goes to outside of fence). So, the cords get covered with snow, the snow gets into the connection where tank heater and cord connect, and blows the GFCI. Of course then the water freezes, animals have no water, and if it freezes hard enough, a $100 tank ruptures.
Anyhow, I'm looking for a suggestion what to use to seal these connections that is easy to remove and can be put on in cold (and sometimes wet) conditions. Electrical tape gets too stiff in the cold and does not seal well since its too stiff, and dont work at all if the cord is a little wet from snow. Duct tape works a little better but still not real well, and is a pain to remove (Sometimes I have to remove it several times in winter to change heaters accorsing to the temperature, since I have 250W 500W and 1000W heaters. (I try to change them to match the temperature and cut down on excessive electrical use).
Is there some other tape, or anything else that I can use to seal these joints, which can be put on in cold and damp conditions, and is easy to remove? Or do they make something for this use? (This is a rural area, so there is not much specialty things sold in the stores).
Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks
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On 1/9/2011 4:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

A little searching turned this up:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/3938nhx
There are all sorts of water tight connectors available.
TDD
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On Sunday, January 9, 2011 at 4:45:06 AM UTC-6, The Daring Dufas wrote:

I recently came across these things. They are weatherproof gaskets for outdoor electrical connections. I use them and they work great. I've had them sit in puddles of water for days without tripping GFCIs. You might check them out. (Amazon.com product link shortened) http://www.rainblock.net
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On Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:38:46 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A mitt-full of grease.
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 12:49:01 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As long as we're reopening a 5 year old thread, I'll play along...
When I was in the USCG in AK, we sometimes had to repair the cables for the runway lights. We had these kits that contained a 2 piece rubber case, rubber bushings to seal the ends and a tube of sealant, almost like roofing tar.
We'd repair the break in the cable, clamp the case over the repair and then inject the sealant which would eventually cure around the break.
Almost like a healed broken bone, the repair site was stronger than the original cable.
For Painted Cow:
USCG - United States Coast Guard AK - Alaska
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Oren posted for all of us...

Is this a guy, a girl, or an it? I have seen you refer to it as both so I am cornfused.
--
Tekkie

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On Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:38:46 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I've had an extension cord sit on pavement and on the grass and sometimes under a foot of snow for years, probably 10 years by now, with no protection at all without tripping a GFI. Maybe once it tripped, but that could have happened because of the 4 indoor receptacles on the same breaker.
When I pick up the cord, unless it's quite dry, I put my hand a yard from the end, just in case, but I've never gotten even a tingle.
I can't call it a connection because whatever would be plugged in, I take in at night, although I've probably had a radio plugged in a few clear non-winter nights.
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wrote:
I've done nothing for years and the GFI has not tripped.
I've had an extension cord sit on pavement and on the grass and sometimes under a foot of snow for years, probably 10 years by now,
==> and under heavy rain too. 10/365/24 whatever the weahter is.
with no protection at all without tripping a GFI. Maybe once it tripped, but that could have happened because of the 4 indoor receptacles on the same breaker.
When I pick up the cord, unless it's quite dry, I put my hand a yard from the end, just in case, but I've never gotten even a tingle.
I can't call it a connection because whatever would be plugged in, I take in at night, although I've probably had a radio plugged in a few clear non-winter nights.
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I recently came across these things. They are weatherproof gaskets for outdoor electrical connections. I use them and they work great. I've had them sit in puddles of water for days without tripping GFCIs. You might check them out. (Amazon.com product link shortened) http://www.rainblock.net
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$5.99 for package of 5, but then it says $0.30/pack. What is the scoop?
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On Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 12:50:57 PM UTC-4, taxed and spent wrote:

Save your money. Buy a box of 100 vinyl gloves and some zip ties from Harbor Freight. Fold the cord ends over each other, slip a glove over the plug/receptacle and secure it with a zip tie. Position the glove "fingers up" and let it rain.
I do this at Halloween and Christmas and have never had a GFCI trip.
A power strip can be covered with a plastic box with some weight on top so it doesn't blow away. One extension cord to a "hub location" and then multiple cords from there.
Something like this...
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Sterilite-Large-FlipTop-Box-Clear-6pk/44785806
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The OP is from 2011!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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On 3/29/2016 10:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

I'm going to report you to the society for prevention of cruelty to exclamation points!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 04:02:29 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I wrap the connections on the cords I use for Christmas lights with plastic wrap, the plain old stuff used to cover foods. A couple of wraps of that, and then a zip tie on each cord. Seems to work well and is pretty easy to remove. I doubt it would work if totally submerged in water, but for snow and rain it seems to work fine.
HTH,
Paul F.
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On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 06:28:50 -0500, Paul Franklin

Your idea sounds good. I was going to suggest wrapping in any kind of a second-hand plastic bag, like from groceries, than putting tape over the bag at each end, so you wouldn't be sticking the tape to the cord, and you could cut it and take it off completely and throw away the bag and the tape easily.

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Ditto this for both Christmas and some temporary connections for our home construction. Plus I often add a ziploc bag over the connection to shed water. I keep the opening pointed down so any moisture that accumulates can drip out. This is temporary, and might be light- weight for your use, but it works for a month or so.
Rob
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I wrap the connections on the cords I use for Christmas lights with plastic wrap, the plain old stuff used to cover foods. A couple of wraps of that, and then a zip tie on each cord. Seems to work well and is pretty easy to remove. I doubt it would work if totally submerged in water, but for snow and rain it seems to work fine.
HTH,
Paul F.
------------------------
I'm in Canada and that's what I do. Saran Wrap stays flexible in the cold and I use CSA or UL electrical tap to hold the wrap in place but zip-ties is a good idea. Got it on the Xmas lights around my house roof and front yard trees and there is about 10 cm or 3 inches of snow sitting on top of the connections. Snow can stay on top of the connections for months before melting some years.
Don't use old electrical cords. you'll want the insulation to be flexible and uncrackabl and most importantly you'll want the prongs not to unplug themselves due to freeze thaw cycles. Worn prongs and plugs don't stay in place as well.
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One of the many advantages of the stretch wrap that I use is that no tape or tie wraps are needed.
Since it sticks to itself when stretched, nothing else is needed to hold it in place.
With nothing holding it in place except its own properties, it makes removal much easier also.
In addition, it can be used to secure cords (or light strings) to poles, railings or anything else that you can wrap it around.
It's also much cheaper than Saran Wrap or any other kitchen wrap.
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On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 04:51:09 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

What do you consider to be stretch wrap?
There are several brands of transparent wrap, and unlike aluminum foil or waxed paper, each has different qualities.

So it's nothing that is sold for the kitchen. So what are you talking about? What is the brand name? Where is it sold?
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* * *

I included an image link in my earlier post.
http://www.movingboxdallas.com/images/stretchwrap.jpg
This is the same material used to wrap pallets for shipping.
http://www.selftrading.co.uk/files/images/pallet-101-wrapped.JPG

***
Right.
http://www.movingboxdallas.com/images/stretchwrap.jpg
This is the same material used to wrap pallets for shipping.
http://www.selftrading.co.uk/files/images/pallet-101-wrapped.JPG

That probably depends on where you buy it.

I didn't include a link to a specific source since it is available from many places, including (probably) the borgs and most moving supply companies, e.g. U-Haul, etc.
Here's a link to a couple of Harbor Freight options.
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?category=&q=stretch+wrap
I have a roll of the "hand held" version that I use for all sorts of wrapping needs, including the junctions of outdoor extension cords used for holiday decorations.
I have a large odd-shaped item in my gargage that I wanted to protect with a moving blanket. With my daughter holding the blanket in place, I used the stretch wrap in a couple of strategic locations and the blanket hasn't moved in years.
A former hobby required me to use a number of ratchet tie downs. I don't need them very often now, so instead of keeping them in the bucket where they tend to get all tangled up, I rolled up each set, wrapped them in the stretch wrap and put them in small box until they're needed.
If you've over stuffed your plastic storage bin and the top keep popping off, run some strech wrap around it the top'll stay in place forever.
Once you start using, it, you'll keep finding more uses for it.
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