What exactly is an AC ton?

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Perhaps I should have said that a bit different - most of the countries that are officially metric (which is most countries) will not be using HP for anything, except informally.
Do a google search for "kw engine power", and you'll see countries all over the world (JP, AU, KR, SE, DE, UA, PL etc) using Kw, often alone, or sometimes with a horsepower rating in brackets.
Not just diesels. I saw a australian web pages with stihl weedwacker specs that only quoted kilowatts.
Most people in Canada are familiar with horsepower, not watts of mechanical energy, but government regulation/documents produced since metrification I believe are in watts and kw.
The Owner's manual for our car gives both.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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288 000 BTU / 24 Hrs 12000 BTU / Hr 1 Ton of water = 2000 Lbs 144 BTU / Lb = 288 000 BTU = 3.52 kW = 3520 J / s = Total BOREDOM = WOT U WONT TO KNOW FOR ANYWAY WOT R U A MASOCHIST

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you cannot relate to. Funny that my UK friends are mostly metric but still measure their body weight in stones ;) Frank
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Personally, I don't struggle with any of those measurements.
Steve Barker

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The mount of alternating current (AC) whose weight equals one ton at sea level.
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The ammount of heat required to melt one ton of ice, over a 24 hour period. Ending up with 32 degree (F) water.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Jul 13, 2:56 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

While we're at it, one would think that they would specify that the ice must be at 32F, so that it's the sublimation heat. Otherwise, I could take ice that is at -50 deg and ice that is at 32F and it would take two different amounts of energy to melt it.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Well, precisely they do...
"In the US, the standard commercial "ton" of refrigeration represents a performance capacity rate equivalent to the cold effect of a ton of ice (2000 lb) melting per day from and at 32F, latent heat of fusion taken at 144 Btu/lb."
-- Perry's Chem E Handbook, 4th Ed, 12-4
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