wet thread protectant

I work on equipment, where there is a valve cap that gets cold and wet. the threads tend to rust, and make it impossible to remove the valve cap.
I've tried WD, PB Blaster (they rapidly evaporate) and a couple types of grease. What can be used to keep these threads from rusting?
Makes me wonder if Rectorseal #5 slow set is the choice? Marine grease? Dielectric grease? White lithium grease? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
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On 4/30/2013 9:01 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Teflon pipe dope is what I've used on refrigeration service valve caps on the suction side. I haven't had one stick with a thin film of it on the service valve threads. ^_^
TDD
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Sounds like the voice of experience. Thanks. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Teflon pipe dope is what I've used on refrigeration service valve caps on the suction side. I haven't had one stick with a thin film of it on the service valve threads. ^_^
TDD
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On 4/30/2013 7:01 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Valve cap? Do you mean like on a tire valve? If so, all the valves I have seen are brass. Most cap I have seen in the last 20 years are plastic. Do you have something else in mind?
In case you have steel on steel, or something like that getting wet, I would suggest anti-sieze compound of some type.
Paul
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On 4/30/2013 10:22 AM, Paul Drahn wrote:

Paul, take a look at the valves in the picture, notice the steel caps on three of the valves. those caps cover the valve stem which is a 1/4" square drive stem which needs a wrench to turn it. Some service valves are made of steel with steel caps which can rust in place. ^_^
http://www.muellerindustries.com/products/hvac-refrigeration/refrigeration-valves/packed-line-valves
http://tinyurl.com/cc8wp7v
TDD
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This is fairly close, the black cap is what rots on. http://upload.ecvv.com/upload/Product/20123/China_refrigeration_valves201 232849321.JPG
. Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Paul, take a look at the valves in the picture, notice the steel caps on
three of the valves. those caps cover the valve stem which is a 1/4" square drive stem which needs a wrench to turn it. Some service valves are made of steel with steel caps which can rust in place. ^_^
http://www.muellerindustries.com/products/hvac-refrigeration/refrigeratio n-valves/packed-line-valves
http://tinyurl.com/cc8wp7v
TDD
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On 4/30/2013 8:02 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That black cap is a Bakelite or fiber filled plastic, not steel and the Teflon paste will work for those too. You can put a dab on your finger and make like a proctologist to the cap making sure all the threads have a light coat of Teflon paste. ^_^
TDD
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Just goes to show that I'm bipartisan, open minded, and certainly not racist. I'm using white Teflon paste on black caps, so that they have freedom of motion.
Thank you for the real world experience, I'll try and find some white teflon paste to use. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
That black cap is a Bakelite or fiber filled plastic, not steel and the Teflon paste will work for those too. You can put a dab on your finger and make like a proctologist to the cap making sure all the threads have
a light coat of Teflon paste. ^_^
TDD
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On 5/1/2013 5:28 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

A little dab 'l do ya. ^_^
TDD
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My Dad used that same expression, when I was a kid. That's an old memory. Thank you. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On 5/1/2013 5:28 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

A little dab 'l do ya. ^_^
TDD
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I've mentioned it before, but I use Teflon tape for similar uses.
It seems to be as good as antiseize but less messy.
I think I even have some on trumpet valve caps. (very fine threads, often left in place for long periods of time, but removal is necessary for lubrication)
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On Tue, 30 Apr 2013 08:22:29 -0700, Paul Drahn

one. Anyiseize works well if you must stick with a ferrous cap.
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The brass and plastic caps also rot on. One more example of you offering advice where you don't have experience. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Better yet, replace the cap with a non-ferrous one - or a plastic one. Anyiseize works well if you must stick with a ferrous cap.
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Yes, that, or over the controlling stem. In either case, "should" not be under pressure.
I'm working on steel threads, and some times brass. Caps can be steel, brass, or plastic. With steel threads, all three caps rot on. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
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Valve cap? Do you mean like on a tire valve? If so, all the valves I have seen are brass. Most cap I have seen in the last 20 years are plastic. Do you have something else in mind?
In case you have steel on steel, or something like that getting wet, I would suggest anti-sieze compound of some type.
Paul
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