Wet lawn

Page 1 of 2  
What is so bad about mowing a lawn when it is wet (from dew)? I do not bag the clippings - let them go back into the ground.
LB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 08:01:14 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

They tend to clog the mower much easier. You'll need to clean the underneath for sure since it will all stick much more than usual.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The grass clumps together, and doesn't work itself back to the ground. Big clumps of dead grass laying on live grass isn't visually appealing, as you can imagine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 08:01:14 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

Grass blades will not be cut at the same height so the lawn will be uneven. Some blades may be ripped, not cut clean, and may be pulled out instead of cut (like using a dull mower blade). The wet grass will clump, clogging the mower and laying in matted lumps on the lawn, choking out the grass underneath. The water may cause the mower to rust.
--
Luke
______________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 08:01:14 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

In addition to the other comments, cutting wet grass will cause ragged edge cuts of the grass blades. This, in turn, makes the grass more susceptible for fungus, brown patch.
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Huh? Rotary mower leaves ragged edges; best you can do there is keep blade sharp. If that's still a concern, how'bout a reel-type?
J
Rolling Thunder wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8 Jun 2005 09:58:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

That's why it is recommended to sharpen your rotary blades after every five cuttings, to minimize the ragged edges. You will see a big difference between a sharp rotary blade and a jagged one.
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

Hi, Can't make clean cut so basically you're injuring grass. That's why we need to keep the mower blade sharp. Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

....and worst of all, it gets green grass stains on your white sneakers. :-)
Don
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Donald Gares wrote:

Thanks to all that replied. Having no choice (house is being shown to possible buyer in a few hours) I went ahead anyway. Mower is 6hp about 20 inch and there does not appear to have been much clumping. Poor cutting is not much of an issue cause "lawn" is not that great anyway. My "white sneakers" are a pair of old golf shoes that I got very heap about 20 years ago. They already are very stained. Using the shoes aerates the lawn while I cut:-))
LB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 11:12:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

Why didn't you say you needed to cut the lawn wet this *one time* in the first place? A little more practice withholding significant information and you can be a politician ;-). The golf shoe cleats don't "aerate" the lawn, they just dig it up :-).
--
Luke
___________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Luke wrote:

Actually not a one time thing if it looks OK since it is cooler in the AM.
What makes you think the spikes dig up the lawn. If golf shoes dug up the grass would the golf course folks use them?
LB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 16:55:30 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

[snippage]
Yeah, know about that. Still, it's best to wait till the lawn dries off ... but it's your lawn ... for now ;-).

Golf courses have grounds crews to re-seed, re-sod, water, fertilize, aerate, roll, fill, etc. and otherwise repair damage caused by those they charge for the privilege of spoiling a good walk.
--
Luke
___________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

PS: Effective aeration is cores penetrating 2-3 inches deep, 20-40 holes per square foot, done in either fall or spring. See, e.g.,: http://www.agry.purdue.edu/turf/pubs/ay8.htm
--
Luke
______________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Luke wrote:

But, but, but Why would golf courses even allow spiked shoes if they cause so much damage. My eyes tell me the damage is not there. Of course I have never played golf because, as you noted its a way of "spoiling a good walk"
BTW Great sig.
LB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 09 Jun 2005 05:26:32 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notmine.com wrote:

[snip]
Because golf courses are about golf, not good grass. You wouldn't want a golf course lawn. It would be far too much work, though the tendency these days is for lower maintenance in the "rough".
Anyway, if your lawn looks good to you, keep on doing what you're doing and enjoy it. But you have been warned, so keep a sharp eye out for the Lawn Police ;-).

Thanks.
--
Luke
___________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Most golf course don't allow real spikes anymore. I haven't seen a pair on a course for quite awhile.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They don't. That's why metal spikes are banned on nearly every course. Too much damage around the cup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have to disagree about your comment about golf shoes. Every little bit to punch through the thatch is a good thing. Walking behind a mower won't dig up anything but help make the lawn purr like a cat.
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What thatch? And if there were actual thatch golf shoe spikes would do nothing; a dethatching machine is needed. More effective would be to stop excessive watering and fertilizing and general intensive lawn management to prevent thatch in the first place.
--
Luke
______________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.