Waterproof Membrane for water run off


I'm using gravel to provide an incline for water run off away from the house Managed to snag a load of gravel for nothing, so might as well use it. Plus this is under the eaves of a house and the gutters occasionally leak and overflow, so gravel is being used to prevent erosion.
I have one layer of gravel inclined away from the house and would like to place a waterproof membrane over this layer, and then place another layer of gravel on top. The first layer is already inclined away from the house.
What type of membrane or plastic sheeting would be best to use? Something that is fairly durable and long lasting.
Thanks in advance !!
Peter
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote in news:u5877598iigth4i3np5nmr3p8otq08ukro@ 4ax.com:

And made to withstand water, temp extremes, sunlight and rocks on top?
    Pond construction liner.
EDPM (vs PVC) liner would probably be the Crθme de la Crop.
You didn't say cheap.
Maybe try roofing supplier as well. I believe I've seen in this group that EDPM is used in certain roofing applications. I know the pond liners run 20 and 45 mil thick.
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I agree that would certainly be the ultimate choice.
Some lower cost options include 4-6 mil plastic or a single row of roofing shingles placed end to end.
I would use landscape fabric cut into strips. It is not water proof but would serve the purpose of allowing heavy flow to run off.
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install a perforated pipe running to daylight ...........
far better to upgrade to larger gutters and downspouts. water cascading down side of home can cause big grief:( like rot, mold on inside of home, detoriation of brick and even siding.
better to fix the real problem than try to redirect water.
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I assume by gravel he means washed gravel or stone? If it's true gravel, ie stones mixed with sand, clay, etc then I don;'t see the point at all. Even with stone, it doesn't sound like a good plan to put a membrane between the existing stone, then more stone on top. The water has no place to go and with an irregular surface to the membrane, will tend to pool up in spots and stay there until it evaporates.
Normally, just having the grade slope away from the house is sufficient to move water away
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The ground is still generally sloping away from the house, but there are a few problem areas that need to be fixed and erosion areas which needed to be prevented. The area is under a gutter which, doesn't seem to handle the torrential thunderstorms during the summer time.
Choice of material is more of an opportune thing.... I picked up about one and a half tons of washed gravel no clay or soil.... sitting around doing absolutely nothing, so considered this would do the job of preventing future erosion.... and because the gravel can be inclined very nicely, a plastic membrane would help divert the water into the backyard away from the foundation.... the fact that some water MAY be retained in small pockets in the membrane isn't all that important as there are foundation plants which could use the moisture. I'm inclining the gravel about 24 " away from the house, into another gently sloping area starting at 36 which has foundation plants... so the runoff will have plenty of places to be used.
Compelling reasons the gravel was 1 - free 2 already onsite 3 - I needed to use it for something.. Beats the heck out of hauling fill dirt. to regrade and then worry about compaction and erosion again.
Hopes that explains the why !!
Peter
On Sat, 1 Aug 2009 07:41:45 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

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bob haller wrote:

Hmmm, Some learns things the HARD way. Doing things first time right saves a lot in the long run. I think the real problem is undersized gutter system.
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On Fri, 31 Jul 2009 22:04:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Thanks again for all the responses..... the pond liner membrane seems to be the best and is readily available. Roofing material is a second best. Both are good suggestions for the purpose.
Torrential downpours, those who have experienced them know what they are like..... those who haven't experienced them haven't a clue. This is Maryland, the humidity bowl of the East, with the Chesapeake on one side and the mountains on the other. July and August temps in the 90's and occasionally triple digits. High humidity... I was actually watching the haze from evaporating water yesterday while the thunderheads were starting to grow... hours later it was coming down in buckets. An hour later the sun was out again.
Anyway... as always, thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience. The people in this newsgroup are the most helpful in the world !!!
Peter
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I didn't see your first post. I think you will find one of the 10 or 15 mil vapor barriers your best choice.
Example: Perminator http://www.wrmeadows.com/wrm00068.htm
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