Water heater dip tube recall??

I have been troubleshooting water and after draining it and refilling it and testing the elements and thermostats which all tested as good. I have now read that water heater made from 93-97 had a recall due to defective plastic dip tubes and the description of the symptoms match what mine is doing excatly. Unfortunatly they all say that you needed to make a claim by the end of 2000. Since this wasn't done and I purchased the home last year do you think I can still get something done about it? Otherwise is it difficult to swap the part out myself?? Is it worth the trouble on a 8 year old water heater? I assume that it would require complete draining and unhooking then diassembling it to get to the dip tube, or is it easier then that of simply unhooking the cold water then installing it and flushing it out a few times?
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Mike P wrote:

w/heater you do better just getting a new one as its on it last leg.. also do you know that if the dip tube went bad that you have to clean out the pipes from the hot water heater to the washer and any other hot water pipe to flush out the broken plastic pieces that might be in there...
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Contact the manufacturer. Even if the recall is gone they might give you a discount if you are polite. Never hurts to try.

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Mike P wrote:

I am going to repeat what the others have said, sort of.
First I would contact the manufacturer. They may help.
If not you have a choice. An 8 year old heater is at the end of it's life in some areas. Where I live the usual life is about 15 years, but we have good non-acid water. In some areas an 8 year old would set a record. Consider that before you consider a repair. Ask around if you don't know about your area.
Replacing a dip tube is not hard (if you have good access) and the parts are cheap.
BTW it does not call for complete draining. You just need to shut off the cold water inlet. drain enough out so the level is below the top of the tank. remove the cold water line which is attached to the dip tube. Replace it, put it back together and flush the system. All the usual things like turning off the power/gas etc. apply.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

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Thanks for the advice I called the manufacture today and no luck the guy said I needed to replace it and I should've called in 2000 to get it replaced under recall. I explained to him I did not own the place then but he was no help. I asked about the replacement procedure and it would involve cutting the cold water pipe, and resoldering it after the new tube is installed. The plumber I spoke with said the same thing and quoted me 250-300 for labor plus the cost of parts. I am going to talk to someone tomorrow who manages a contracting companty about it and get a second opinion since I find it hard to believe that its that costly. The water heater probably has another 1-2 years of life on it before it needs replacement, so doing allot of work to it isn't really a good idea in my opinion since its due to die.
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The water heater probably has another 1-2 years of life on it before it needs replacement How did you figure that out? There is absolutely no way of knowing that. It could have another 3 days of life or another seven years. Check with your neighbors to get a better handle on the risk factor (local water quality has a major effect on WH life), but in the end you are just making a guess.
--
Peace,
BobJ

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Marilyn and Bob wrote:

yourself and save the labor on putting in a new one... plumbers dont work for nothing.. you not gonna get a plumber to come out and do anything for $20..... if that is what you expect to pay for it...... i spend quite a bit on books, tools and supplies on fixing things.. i have friends that dont and they go out and spend their money on other things.. i read books on fixing things and try to learn as much as i can.. my friends would not even turn the page of the books i read they are going to the football games and such and enjoying themselves.... so when something breaks they have to call a plumber, electrician, or other tradesman... i dont have to call anyone as i fix it myself: it is paying off.. in the past 30 yrs. in this house i did all the appliance repairs, electrical work, cement work, replacing fences, you name it i had to do it.. i could not or would not pay someone to do something that i could do myself......
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to around here say they get around 9-10 years out of theirs. So 10 years is a safe guess, the plumber also said thats about the life of them. I am sure it would last longer but since I am going through the work of unhooking it and resoldering pipes, I would rather just replace it to be on the safe side. Its cheaper to replace the water heater then it would be to repair the damage of flooding in the basement. Especially since I have someone who has done it a few times and knows how to solder pipes, and is willing to help me do it.
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