Water hammer

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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 19:37:43 -0800, "Guv Bob"

now. Never had that happen before until recently and have not had any plumbing work done. Have you replaced your washing machine hoses with woven metal covered hoses? That will cause it. The totally rubber hoses can prevent water hammer. (Athough maybe the hammer I had mostly occurred when the washing machine was running. It's been 18 years and I forgot this. But the remedy may be the same. )
But unless you turn the water off every time you finish using the wshing machine, you should replace the hoses. Otherwise they'll burst after about 10 years.

the piping, so I'll have to get on this one quick. But before I jump into it head first, I've gotten a lot of good advice here and thought the great mind might have some tips.

I think air is the remedy, not the cause. Air is compressable, so air in the system makes the water slow down gradually.

you know any way to tell? Sounds like there are different things to try and I'd just as soon start with the most likely and easiest ones first.

tee into the same line within a couple of feet of each other, but only the toilet hammers. Also, in the other end of the house - about 30 feet downstream of the toilet, the kitchen sink faucet hammers.

You can get water hammer arrestors at the hardware store. The screw on between the washing machine and the hoses, or the hoses and the valves. They have air chambers about 4 inches long, and they work.
When you installl these, put in the new hoses with stainless steel woven covers. You may only need an arrestor on the cold water, since that's the water your toilet uses. I think for several years, I only had one. Maybe I still only have one.
Of course the washing machine has a valve that closes the hot water. I use the washing machine a lot less than I flush the toilet, and I don't remember if there is or was hammer from the hot water.
There may be something similar for the bathroom, but the washing machine ones may work for the bathrooms too. .
Eventually the rubber bladder between the air and the water will break, and then after a while, the air will disolve in the water and there will be no air. Then you will need another one. Mine have been working fine for about 18 years.

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wrote:

The water hammer arrestors are a good fix for the problem. I've had one on the cold water line near the main house valve for 9 years now with no problems and no water hammer. But, having said that and reading your original post again, the likely culprit is the toilet water valve. Since you didn't change any plumbing when the hammer started, it has to come from wear and tear or some kind of system change such as a change in line pressure. I'll vote for a worn toilet water valve that sets up an oscillation in the tank.
Tomsic
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re: "it has to come from wear and tear or some kind of system change such as a change in line pressure."
...or the leaching out of the air in any air gaps that might exist.
Oft times, simply draining the system and then refilling it will put the air back into the air gaps and the problem will go away for many years.
Been there, done that.
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On 2/12/2012 10:37 PM, Guv Bob wrote:

now. Never had that happen before until recently and have not had any plumbing work done. I did a little net research and see that this could cause damage or leaks in the piping, so I'll have to get on this one quick. But before I jump into it head first, I've gotten a lot of good advice here and thought the great mind might have some tips.

could have come from? I've tried running the water in all the faucets high and low to try and bleed it but don't see much difference.

do you know any way to tell? Sounds like there are different things to try and I'd just as soon start with the most likely and easiest ones first.

tee into the same line within a couple of feet of each other, but only the toilet hammers. Also, in the other end of the house - about 30 feet downstream of the toilet, the kitchen sink faucet hammers.

I have one line to a toilet that will hammer violently if the wall shutoff valve isn't fully open. Fully open there is no problem at all.
Probably won't help you but but its easy enough to check.
John
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