wall plug wiring

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While looking at this wall plug, I noticed it has a designated side for white wire, and a designated side for black wire. In the past I never saw that on a plug and just put it on whichever side was handy.
Is there a valid reason for putting a specific color wire on a specific side? I personally wouldn't think so, but maybe an electrician would know a reason, or someone more knowledgeable.
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On 01/30/2016 11:24 PM, dangerous dan wrote:

There's been a definite neutral and line side since the introduction of polarized plugs and three wire circuits. That goes back at least to the '60s if not earlier; I don't recall just when precisely.
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On 1/31/2016 12:30 AM, dpb wrote:

Also worth knowing WHY, precisely. There is a good reason which does make sense.
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On 1/30/2016 11:24 PM, dangerous dan wrote:

Turn off the circuit breaker for that outlet
Neutral (White) goes to silver screw
Hot (Black) goes to gold screw
Step by step available all over the internet; just Google it or go to
http://www.artofmanliness.com/2013/04/11/how-to-wire-an-outlet/
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On 1/31/2016 12:24 AM, dangerous dan wrote:

Plugs should be polarized for proper grounding of appliances plugged into the receptacle. You will also notice that plugs have one prong larger to mate with the wider slot of the receptacle to everything is properly polarized. Small prong is hot, wide is the neutral. Yes, your lamp will light either way but you toaster may shock you if not properly grounded.
If you look at lamp cords you will notice that one side looks a bit different than the other side, usually ribbed. That is so if you splice it or put a new end you can get it right. Smooth is the hot side, ribbed is neutral.
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On Sunday, January 31, 2016 at 12:56:32 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I don't know of any appliance that relies on the neutral for actual grounding. Two wire devices are not grounded and AFAIK, they don't have the case connected to the neutral. Polarization is important because the appliance is designed to expect one wire to be the hot, the other the neutral. For example, with a simple floor lamp, the tab at the bottom goes to the hot side, the side of the socket to the neutral. If the light is left on while changing a bulb, it's easier to accidentally touch the side, not so easy to touch the tab at the bottom. With the side at neutral potential which is close to ground potential, if you touched the side of the socket while standing in water, you shouldn't get a shock, any voltage potential there should be minimal. With other appliances, similar applies. The switch to cut off power to the appliance is going to be on the side that is supposed to be hot for example. The appliance would still work plugged in the other way, but if you start to take it apart while it's plugged in, have the switch off, parts that you think would not be energized, will be.
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Really ! ? Are you saying that the metal body of my toaster is "grounded" to the neutral wire of the power cord ? for safety. Imagine that someone forces the 2-prong polarized plug into the wall - - backwards ! John T.
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On 01/31/2016 08:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

No, that would not be the case. The "hot" wire would simply go to the switch. Any device with a grounded case would require a three prong plug with a ground wire.
I don't know what year polarized plugs and outlets became the standard but I do know the outlets in the house my parents had built in 1957 had them. (No ground prong provision though)
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On 1/31/2016 9:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

Trader4 explained it better than I did. Your toaster may be grounded with a third wire to ground or may be double insulated. My old toaster had an outside plastic housing but new toaster has a 3 wire plug and metal housing.
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 09:57:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

Trader summed it up nicely. If you have the polarity swapped on your toaster, the switch is opening the neutral and when you stick the fork in there to get the bagel out, it will light you up.
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 11:06:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well, that's why they call it a toaster.
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On 1/31/2016 11:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That Stormin guy said much the same. The toaster shell should either be isolated, or grounded.
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wrote:

I read once toaster shells aren't grounded because of what could happen if people hit the heating element pushing the toast down. Forks? Knives?
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 18:12:43 -0600, "Dean Hoffman"

People who stick metal forks, knives, etc into toasters, should be sent to the electric chair, because they are too stupid to deserve to be alive! :)
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On 1/31/2016 7:12 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

toaster, might do that some day for raw excitement. My toaster has two wire cord and plug, so the shell is probably isolated. Does anyone have a three wire corded toaster to test?
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 19:42:19 -0500, Stormin Mormon

has been a grounded toaster sold in North America in over 40 years - and I have NEVER seen one that was not isolated from the factory.. Some of the better ones even switched both wires years ago.
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On 2016-01-31 8:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Years ago my mother complained about being shocked when doing dishes, checking out the situation I found if a metal pan in the dish rack was touching the toaster and you touch it and the sink you got zapped. Using a meter there was 120V between the toaster and the sink, non-polarized plug, reverse the plug and no problems.
Replaced the plug with a three prong to prevent reversing the plug.
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 20:31:36 -0700, Idlehands

We had an Emerson radio from the 40's. A chip was missing from the case, and it sat on a metal set of shelves, so the chassis touched the metal shelf. We also had chrome trim around the formica kitchen counter (before they used formica in the front), and when I touched both the shelf and the trim, I'd get a small tingle. (Nothing like a full 110 volts. I've had that too.) My mother never mentioned this and I was too stupid to figure out the problem or fix it.
I still have the radio. Maybe I should change the plug.
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wrote:

They used to put a small capacitor and/or high value resistor between the incoming power and the chassis. I can't remember why - maybe someone here will know. It allowed a small current to flow which would give you that tingling feeling if you lightly rubbed your fingers across the chassis.
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wrote:

Just put a polarized 1-15 on it and be sure the wide prong is connected to the chassis side.
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