Walk in bathtubs ?

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On 3/23/2015 5:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I can understand the relaxing. I just don't feel as clean coming out of a tub of soapy water as I do after a shower that rinsed all the dirt away. Enjoy your choice.
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If I was really dirty, I have used a hose shower that connects to the faucet spout, and just rinsed off while the water was draining. As long as you stay seated, and keep the spray pointed at yourself (not outside the tub), your dont really even need a shower curtain. That suits all needs.
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On Saturday, March 21, 2015 at 7:51:43 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I looked at these last Fall and they had many models and sizes to choose fr om. The going price starts at about $4,000 but by the time you add all the extras they are about $7,000. The showroom here states they do it ALL but I do have the feeling it would be more like a 2 day or perhaps a 3 day job .
Yes, you do have to be IN the tub before it starts filling and remain in it while it drains. I did see where one company (Jaccuzi?) had an extra pump that could be purchased that guarantees to empty the tub in 90 seconds. T hey are nice if a person does have mobility problems such as stepping over a tub, but golly they are expensive!!
Co-workers aunt was SERIOUSLY considering having one installed which includ ed a complete bathroom remodel but the final price quoted her was $11,000. (Gulp)
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On Tue, 24 Mar 2015 12:48:45 -0700 (PDT), ItsJoanNotJoann
If that was for a complete remodel, is was not a bad price. I did two bathroom in the past year and with minimal outside labor, buying supplies at the wholesale price, I spent more than that in each one.
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On Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 6:53:24 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

luded a complete bathroom remodel but the final price quoted her was $11,00 0. (Gulp)

I'm looking at doing a complete bathroom remodel on the original 1920's bat hroom in my house. I replaced the toilet about 2 or 3 years ago with an Am erican Standard Cadet (?). Sorry, I can't remember the exact name but it's the one that will effortlessly flush 18 golf balls; HIGHLY RECOMMEND. Any way, I'm sorta dreading the remodel as I know it will be expensive. That's one reason I had looked at the walk-in tubs, toying with idea of one in ca se I should need something easy to get in and out of in the future. But al so sorta looking forward to a brand spanking new bathroom as well.
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On 3/25/2015 3:03 PM, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

Do you have another bathroom? Ours was down for some time to do the work.
In our case, shower access was a major factor so we eliminated the tub. They make shower pans that line up with the drain so that portion of the plumbing was easier. We used Swanstone shower pan and sink. The shower is 32 x 60 so there is plenty of room and we have a chair in there too.
We did ceramic tile about 5' up except in the shower that goes all the way. Floor is tile too. Everything is good quality. Kohler faucets, rainhead and handheld, glass door, Bertch vanity. We spent about $13000 on each but I had a lot of free labor.
It is the only bath remodel we'll ever do, so I wanted it to be first class.
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On Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 3:16:39 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

bathroom in my house. I replaced the toilet about 2 or 3 years ago with a n American Standard Cadet (?). Sorry, I can't remember the exact name but it's the one that will effortlessly flush 18 golf balls; HIGHLY RECOMMEND. Anyway, I'm sorta dreading the remodel as I know it will be expensive. Th at's one reason I had looked at the walk-in tubs, toying with idea of one i n case I should need something easy to get in and out of in the future. Bu t also sorta looking forward to a brand spanking new bathroom as well.

.

Yes, I had an addition built onto the back of my house almost 8 years ago a nd that was one of the requirements. Very large bathroom compared to the 1 920's 5 x 7 bathroom that needs to be remodeled.


I want to keep a tub in the remodel, just have to look around for a short o ne.


My sister-in-law is a class A tiler and she said she would do this for me i f I chose tile.

Even though it's a small bathroom I still want it to look spiffy. Just hav en't gotten my head wrapped around the idea yet that it all needs to be rip ped out.
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On 3/25/2015 4:57 PM, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

That will save you a bundle. The guy that did mine worked cheap, but it was still $2000.

We visited a couple of plumbing supply showrooms. We avoided the lower quality stuff at Home Depot and opted for a couple of levels up. Tuern the handle on a faucet and you can tell the difference.
Be sure to get a comfort height toilet unless you are very short, and a slow close lid.
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On Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 6:29:02 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

me if I chose tile.


She does a fantastic job and cuts her tiles precisely.

haven't gotten my head wrapped around the idea yet that it all needs to be ripped out.



I'm going to keep the new toilet. I would like the vanity top to continue over the top of the toilet tank. Of course it wouldn't be the same depth o f the vanity, just a narrow shelf over the john. That is one drawback to t he new toilets that their tanks are narrower and don't fit close to the wal l like the old 5 gallon toilet tanks used to. Thus the need for a narrow c ontinuous shelf over it.
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On 3/25/2015 10:36 PM, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

Good. John did a perfect job. We used epoxy ground but there is some new urethane grout that may be better and easier to use.

Narrows down what you can use for the top but there are still many choices. You just have to have easy access to the tank innards.
Our vanities are 48" so we just have a framed marror and a cabinet over the toilet. Plenty of storage space with the drawers and under sink..
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im going to keep the new toilet. I would like the vanity top to continue o ver the top of the toilet tank. Of course it wouldn't be the same depth of the vanity, just a narrow shelf over the john. That is one drawback to th e new toilets that their tanks are narrower and don't fit close to the wall like the old 5 gallon toilet tanks used to. Thus the need for a narrow co ntinuous shelf over it.
leave enough room so the toilet can be serviced. removing tank lid and acce ss to the workings
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On Friday, March 27, 2015 at 6:04:05 AM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

over the top of the toilet tank. Of course it wouldn't be the same depth of the vanity, just a narrow shelf over the john. That is one drawback to the new toilets that their tanks are narrower and don't fit close to the wa ll like the old 5 gallon toilet tanks used to. Thus the need for a narrow continuous shelf over it.

cess to the workings

Yes! I have a shelf I bought at Home Depot over the toilet now and I can e asily access the workings of the tank. Not sure, but I think these continu ous shelves over the toilet from the vanity are even narrower than the one I have installed. That would be fine with me.
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On Sat, 21 Mar 2015 03:22:06 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

My refrigerator gasket seem pretty good at 36 years, but I don't have a way to really test it.
Our parking lot flooded 3 years ago, and I moved my car, but I wonder how well the door seal would have kept the water out. A neighbor decided she needed a new car, although I can't imagine that the carpet coulnd't be shampood clean.

It's the depth that determines the water pressure.

Well, it has to be empty when the bather goes in and empty when he leaves, so I guess he should pay attention while he's in there. Maybe some water alarm would be a good idea, but it wouldn't have to be loud.
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On Sat, 21 Mar 2015 03:22:06 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I don't want to hijack your thread, but I assume anyone who wants to answer on topic will still be able to. ;-)
I don't like my tub in part because it's not deep enough**. So I called Bathfitter to find out if they could put a deeper tub on top of mine, without moving the hot and cold valves, and if it woudl be strong enough that I could still sit on the edge of the tub. That is, would the part above my original edge be strong enough hollow, or could they reinforce the side of the tub where it was taller than my own tub?
So far, they have refused to say a thing unless they can send out a salesman, or whatever they call him. The guy says only the technicians know and they are all out looking at bathrooms. I think I asked if I could leave a messsage so that one of them could call me, but if I did he said no.
After some diligence, I found a competitor, ReBath. I should call them next.
But I'm going to call Bathfitter back and come up with some story why I need an answer in advance. There's no reason they can't answer my question on the phone.
**When I lived in what had been a luxury apartment building in Brooklyn, the tub was so deep and big I could float in it, with only about 1 square inch of my butt touching the bottom. The faucets were on the side too so I barely had to move to adjust the temperature.
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On 3/21/2015 3:11 PM, micky wrote:

Without changing the existing plumbing? If the faucets exit the wall above the existing tub I suppose that could be done. Most I have seen are mounted through the tub wall so filling above that point would not be a good idea. Not to mention the overflow outlet which must be through the tub wall to be of any use. No plumbing work at all would seem unlikely here. Something like a free standing claw foot tub maybe.
Frankly, I wouldn't do all that work without replacing the valves, overflow etc. with new anyway.
No wonder they didn't want to commit without an on sight inspection.
John
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Yes, they do exit the wall above the tub.
They are the limiting factor on how high I'd want to go with the new tub. I need to measure again but it's 4 or 5 inches.
Only the overflow/drain lever is below the top of the tub.

I've already inverted the overflow/drain lever to be able to fill the tub between 2 and 3 inches higher. This makes the fill level so high that it's easy to slosh water on the floor. Raising the tub would alleviate that. But IIRC I wanted to raise the tub 4 inches, and I would want to raise the max water level 2 to 4 inches too. That is the point, not to stop splashing water out but to have deeper water. . For final questions like that, I'd want them to come out to the house, but my first question doesn't require them to visit. (Plus I'm annoyed at how they're treating me.)
The overflow isn't clogged but it doesn't really prevent overflows, in the tub or in the sinks, in my experience. Even if the water is running say 3 or 4 out of 10. Certainly not if it's running faster.. Has anyone else ever verified that their overflow really works?
The overflow drains so slowly, that I've considered splurging and letting it drain while I'm using the tub, replacing the water lost with hot water. I sort of have to do that anyhow, because the water feels colder as time goes on, even though it's not colder. It just seems that way.
Or I could block the overflow completely and rely on myself to never let it overflow. I did that in Brooklyn and in the 10 years I used that tub, I never forgot to turn off the water. And I remembered the week before I moved out, to take the tape off the overflow pipe, so the new tenants would have the overflow working again. (Had I forgotten, I woudl have called my roommate who was still there for 2 weeks and had him do it, or I'd have written the new tenants.)
(This luxury tub didn't use the usual method, but one I've only seen in some old, nice hotels: a pipe sticking up a couple feet outside of the tub, with a tube inside the pipe and a porcelain handle to lift the tube and rotate it a bit. In one positiion, it falls down and plugs the drain (except the overflow which works because there are big holes neear the top of the tube, that lets the water go from outside the tube to inside the tube and down the drain). In the other position, it's held up and the water drains out of the tube at floor level. I put 3M magic tape around the big holes and the tape worked for 10 years too, even though it was under water whenever I took a bath. When I removed it, it wasnt' perfect anymore, but would have lasted another 10 years. )
.

I don't see the point to that. They work fine. I just replaced the hot and cold stems with new. The first stems lasted 35 years and in another 35 years, I'll be dead. (Actually, I think the stems would have lasted a lot longer if I had used flat washers like it seems I was supposed to. I used beveled ones and the plumbing guy said that forced the washer to bulge sideways, and damage the brass band around the washer. And one washer screw head broke off, but I probably could have done a better job of getting it out, or alternatively, putting another screw in.)
(I've saved all the old parts in case I get desperate for parts. People here said I woudlnt' be able to get new stems for a 35 year old fixture, and it's true that the new stems are 1/4 or 3/8" longer than the old ones, and stick out that much farther than the shower/tub diverter knob, but it's not a problem. Oh, and they both used to be right-handed but now the hot water is left-handed. That's okay too.
But I'm sure Bathfitter will try to sell me new fixtures and more, and that's why they want to come out.

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wrote:

My guess is the inside people don't have a clue. They are merely appointment makers. The outside people know the answer and they will give you the hard sell. If you order today . . . .
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I think you're right.
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Yes, they do exit the wall above the tub.
They are the limiting factor on how high I'd want to go with the new tub. I need to measure again but it's 4 or 5 inches.
Only the overflow/drain lever is below the top of the tub.

I've already inverted the overflow/drain lever to be able to fill the tub between 2 and 3 inches higher. This makes the fill level so high that it's easy to slosh water on the floor. Raising the tub would alleviate that. But IIRC I wanted to raise the tub 4 inches, and I would want to raise the max water level 2 to 4 inches too. That is the point, not to stop splashing water out but to have deeper water. . For final questions like that, I'd want them to come out to the house, but my first question doesn't require them to visit. (Plus I'm annoyed at how they're treating me.)
The overflow isn't clogged but it doesn't really prevent overflows, in the tub or in the sinks, in my experience. Even if the water is running say 3 or 4 out of 10. Certainly not if it's running faster.. Has anyone else ever verified that their overflow really works?
The overflow drains so slowly, that I've considered splurging and letting it drain while I'm using the tub, replacing the water lost with hot water. I sort of have to do that anyhow, because the water feels colder as time goes on, even though it's not colder. It just seems that way.
Or I could block the overflow completely and rely on myself to never let it overflow. I did that in Brooklyn and in the 10 years I used that tub, I never forgot to turn off the water. And I remembered the week before I moved out, to take the tape off the overflow pipe, so the new tenants would have the overflow working again. (Had I forgotten, I woudl have called my roommate who was still there for 2 weeks and had him do it, or I'd have written the new tenants.)
(This luxury tub didn't use the usual method, but one I've only seen in some old, nice hotels: a pipe sticking up a couple feet outside of the tub, with a tube inside the pipe and a porcelain handle to lift the tube and rotate it a bit. In one positiion, it falls down and plugs the drain (except the overflow which works because there are big holes neear the top of the tube, that lets the water go from outside the tube to inside the tube and down the drain). In the other position, it's held up and the water drains out of the tube at floor level. I put 3M magic tape around the big holes and the tape worked for 10 years too, even though it was under water whenever I took a bath. When I removed it, it wasnt' perfect anymore, but would have lasted another 10 years. )
.

I don't see the point to that. They work fine. I just replaced the hot and cold stems with new. The first stems lasted 35 years and in another 35 years, I'll be dead. (Actually, I think the stems would have lasted a lot longer if I had used flat washers like it seems I was supposed to. I used beveled ones and the plumbing guy said that forced the washer to bulge sideways, and damage the brass band around the washer. And one washer screw head broke off, but I probably could have done a better job of getting it out, or alternatively, putting another screw in.)
(I've saved all the old parts in case I get desperate for parts. People here said I woudlnt' be able to get new stems for a 35 year old fixture, and it's true that the new stems are 1/4 or 3/8" longer than the old ones, and stick out that much farther than the shower/tub diverter knob, but it's not a problem. Oh, and they both used to be right-handed but now the hot water is left-handed. That's okay too.
But I'm sure Bathfitter will try to sell me new fixtures and more, and that's why they want to come out.

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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com posted for all of us...

Being severely handicapped myself I couldn't lift my legs over the bottom ledge so they are out for me. When I travel I get a room with a roll-in shower. They have seats in them and only about a 1/2" lip. Most work very well but some were "there" for appeasement.
I think Ditra is a brand name that has waterproofing, drains and designs for them. Install extra grab-rails and take care when selecting a non slip tile.
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

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