Walk in bathtubs ?

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I keep seeing these walk in bathtubs advertised on tv commercials. They have a side that opens like a door. THey are intended for the elderly. The concept makes sense, because I am aware of how difficult it is for elders with health issues. However, I find it hard to understand how they can seal those "doors" on the tubs, to be water tight. And even if they do have a good seal, how long do they last?
Like the door seal on a refrigerator, car door, etc, they all seem to fail fairly fast. But for a bathtub, there is a lot of pressure against that seal. I'm not sure of the water capacity, but even 25 gallons weighs about 208 lbs (one gallon is 8.34 lbs). That's a lot of weight against a gasket/seal. And I would think they hold more than 25 gallons.
Of course if the gasket fails, that's a lot of water to flow on the floor and will cause a lot of damage.
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1st off...you and I are too old to worry about such things. We should leave it to the engineers. At my last job I maintained a Whirlpool with a door...they have a locking mechanism that compresses the gasket. The door also wedges into a groove that is smaller than the exterior tub dimensions.
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On Saturday, March 21, 2015 at 4:23:02 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

IDK anything about the reliability of the door seals. But I wouldn't worry about the pressure against the seal being some difficult design problem. Those kinds of design typically don't rely on the seal material to hold the pressure back. It would be logical to use the weight of the water to your advantage by having the seal between the door and the area of the door opening the door presses against. The more pressure, the tighter it pushes against the seal. I haven't looked at one, but I would think it's probably the design they would have. Over time the seal might start to leak and need replacing, but I don't see some difficult design issue or catastrophic problem. If it leaks, it's going to start slowly, not a big flood.
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On 3/21/2015 5:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Have you ever seen one? They are well made and I doubt they would have a high failure rate and the chances are, never a catastrophic failure.
OTOH, I think they are a poor idea anyway. You have to get in before you start filling and they you have to wait until it drains before you can get out. We got rid of the tub altogether and made a large shower and ut a shower seat in there.
The tubs are about $7,000 and up.
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On 3/21/2015 7:51 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Good point. I hadn't thought about the problem of filling and emptying it.
Bill
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wrote:

Plus they advertise "same day installation" --- that is a laugh, as 99.9% of the installation will require plumbing to be moved, electrical to be installed and the walls retiled and possibly the floor redone because the new tub is taller and looks to be shorter in length than most old tubs they replace. These guys are not just tub sellers they are renovation sellers. That must add a ton of costs to the job.
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wrote:

You got a good point there. And they probably only install the tub. The homeowner then needs to hire a plumber, carpenter, tile installer, etc. I dont think there is any need for an electrician though. (For the tub). I dont believe they use electricity.
I also never thought about the need for the person having to get into the tub BEFORE filling it, and cant get out until it's drained. But that does make perfect sense. And that also means that if an elderly person became ill while in the tub, they would not be able to get out till the tub was drained, or else would have to crawl over the top, (which defeats the whole purpose).
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On 3/21/2015 12:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Some do. The ones I looked at to see what kind of door system they had, also were jetted and offered in-line water heaters to maintain the temperature.
I added the in-line heater to our standard American-Standard jetted tub. Quite nice for long soaks in the tub.
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On Sat, 21 Mar 2015 12:27:41 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

That sounds more like a home Spa! But I'm sure they come with a lot of options. When I do a "long soak", I just add more hot water :)
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On Sat, 21 Mar 2015 11:53:21 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Maybe they do it all.

One advertisement says they'll throw in free a heated seat, so that's electric. I take baths all the time, in a regular bathtub, and I've never noticed that the tub bottom was cold. Of course I've put water in already.
As to jets, I personally wouldn't want that. I want peace and quiet.

I'd thought of the first part already, but not this part.

That's good exercise. It will make him appreciate all the times he can just open the door.

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I've only seen them on tv commercials. For $7000 they damn well better be WELL MADE! I have no intention to buy one, I was just curious about how they seal....
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Seems to me it would be a lot easier and cheaper to just put a handheld spray in a shower, put a shower chair in there and just handle it that way, presuming the old folk can step over a 4" shower pan edge.
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On 3/21/2015 9:15 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Pretty much what I did, with two exceptions. 1. It is only a 2" ledge 2. More than just a cheap handheld. They fetch a nice price for brushed nickle fixtures.
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This would not saisfy me, since for me, the goal is to put one's body under the water. However the walk-in tubs don't do much of that either, I think, since people are sitting up and the water only comes, it seems to me. up to one's ribcage, or nipples. And you can't slouch down and get it up to your neck or the top of your head.

My memory is fading, but I think my mother at 88 could still do that. She was losing weight without trying then.
The back up plan though is to make a shower bench, long enough to have half of it inside the tub and half outside. The person sits on the outside and slowly slides to the inside. Lifting each leg while sitting, so that falling is not likely. With a comfortable back at least for the part in the tub.
I don't think they sell such things so I should a) patent it and get rich; b) start making one of them so I'lll have one when I need one.
I'm still naive enough to think I'll never get so weak I need one.
And what I'd rather make for myself is some sort of crane, so I can sit in the tub, on the bottom, like I do now, and crank something that will stand me up, using gears so it won't require a lot of strength on my part. Maybe like those hoists that helipcopiters use when rescuing people. Once I'm up, I can walk out of the tub myself.

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On Sunday, March 22, 2015 at 10:55:27 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

They do make wide shower seats for the obese...problem is...there's no way to seal a shower curtain and the floor floods.
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On 3/23/2015 8:34 AM, bob_villa wrote:

No need for curtains. We have 3/8" thick glass doors, about 30" wide. I've also seen showers with just one panel, but they are not as easy to reach the controls unless you are in the shower already.
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On Monday, March 23, 2015 at 10:31:23 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Keep up with the conversation...he's talking about using a bench-type seat half in the shower! You sit and move into the shower from the floor side.
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On 3/23/2015 3:26 PM, bob_villa wrote:

Yea, that does not mean you need a curtain. Keep up, the world of bathroom design has changed. The single panel would work with it. http://www.dullesglassandmirror.com/frameless-shower-screens.asp
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On Monday, March 23, 2015 at 6:43:31 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You mean when it hits the seat and sprays on the floor?
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wrote:

Same here. For me, taking a bath is not only to get clean, but to soak in hot water and relax. A lot cheaper and healthy form of relaxation than drinking alcohol. I also like to soak for softening callouses on my feet so I can scrape them off afterwards.
Standing in a shower is something I dont even consider as an option. You cant relax while standing, and I do not enjoy bathing at all, if I have to stand. A few times a year I may take a shower just because I have an appointment in a half hour and just want to freshen up. But that is rare. I could go without a shower, but not a bathtub. Yea, I know one can install a shower chair in a shower, but that is still not relaxing. Not to mention that I like to take a bath in winter when I have been outside, and am cold. To shower, I would have to set the house (or bathroom) temperature to about 80deg. before showering. But if I get into a tub of hot water, the house can be 60deg, and I'm fine.
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