Vintage 1984 Maytag washer prob.

We have a Maytag washer that has served us faithfully for over 20 years and survived two cross-country moves.
Recently, while in the wash cycle, the agitator stops and it makes a loud groaning noise for a minute or so. After the noise stops, the agitator doesn't start up again for maybe 5 minutes. The agitator runs only briefly, then the whole thing repeats. The timer is still running so it eventually gets to the rinse cycle and appears to run normally after that point.
Does anyone have any ideas on this one? I'll fix it myself if I can find out what's wrong or at least get an angle on diagnosing it.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hi,
When this occurs, is the motor running or not running?

Appears or is?
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can't tell whether motor is running at this point until it fails again. The problem is intermittent and has gone away for the moment!
My wife thinks the problem occurs only when the water saver is set to small or medium loads. I will have to re-test and let you know.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Greetings,
Have you considred that if you need to purchase a part you can probably purchase a used 84 or better model for less money ($50)? I would ask your local laundry owner with outdated machines how to fix it and if that doesn't work I would spring for a new used one.
Hope this helps, William
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If I can't fix this, I'll spring for a new one. $500 for 20 years troublefree service averages out pretty cheap per year. Thanks for the idea...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is this the Maytag washer with the motor that slides on rails different directions depending on if it runs clockwise or counter clockwise ?
Do a search in Yahoo Groups for FreeCycle. This is a set of groups dedicated to giving away for free stuff people nolonger need. Lots of perfectly running older washers offered in the group for my area. Just supply your own way of getting it from point a to point b.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, I don't see any rails. Motor seems firmly attached to frame of washer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Firmly attached may be the problem. On older Maytag washers, (our was 1981) the bracket was able to slide and was spring loaded. If your is not able to slide it can cause problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is a fine between Vintage and Junc.........84 Maytag wrong side of line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5 Sep 2005 11:12:37 -0700, in alt.home.repair snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

My experience (local to me only) on this sort of stopping/restarting extends to dryers, but essentially the same thing may be taking place. Possibly.
The motor itself may be weakening such that when it gets hot it quits, then later when cooled down it will restart. .....FWIW
Also FWIW, I have been told by washer repairmen that the worst thing I can do for the motor is put the machine on some of the "specialty" cycles (in my case, the Permanent Press cycle). I have no idea why that is, but I always run the regular wash cycle.
FACE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

extends
then
my
always
Most electric motors have a thermal cutout built in. If something jams the motor, it cuts out before the motor burns up.
As the OP always has the same problem at one spot in the "cycle"
I would suggest looking at the transmisson for worn gears or misadjustment.
This is far beyond what most homeowners can do themselves, as it requires a bit more technical skill, and brute force, than most have. (not impossible though)
To save a bit of money you can pull it out, and bring it to someone who can repair it. Most appliance repair places can do it, or may have rebuilt transmissions ready to go. Then just pop the rebuilt one back in.
But the OP is far better off to repair the old one, as newer washers are not built anywhere near as well.
Unless the OP may be considering moving up to one of the newer front loaders to save water & power costs.
AMUN
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It still maybe the timer, those lobes on the timer(which basically acts like a camshaft) can go bad pretty easily over time. And from the sounds of your problems that could be a possibility.
Joe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.