Ventless gas heaters -- my experience

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On Dec 27, 8:40pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Having only installed my own recently, I wish they would tell you that in the manual! I fired up the 120K BTU mother and it filled the house with light smoke. I suspected it was something in there as part of the manufacturing process and that it was normal, but not knowing for sure, you start to wonder if you dropped a tool with a plastic handle or something in there.
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Man, that's frieky. I can easily imagine you wondering what is wrong. I'd also wonder if the thing was about to catch fire, and burn the house down.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Having only installed my own recently, I wish they would tell you that in the manual! I fired up the 120K BTU mother and it filled the house with light smoke. I suspected it was something in there as part of the manufacturing process and that it was normal, but not knowing for sure, you start to wonder if you dropped a tool with a plastic handle or something in there.
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On 12/27/2011 7:40 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Not all do, anyway...I think it probably was left from installation or perhaps are using imported units that are shipped via surface container so do need some corrosion protection.
Just put in two new Carrier units within last 5 months--neither had any such symptom.
--
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Existential Angst wrote:

Whatever is in the air in the shop goes through the heater and is "burned", but with plenty of combustion air you should get only CO2 and water from the heater. A cold room being brought up to temp will condense the water vapor so yes the walls and everything else will get damp until the all is up to normal temp. I use ventless nat gas heaters and they work great for me. The water vapor problem isn't enough to keep static electricity down on dry days. and natural gas is sooooooo cheap, http://www.barchart.com/commodityfutures/Natural_Gas_Futures/NG
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On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 14:14:37 -0500, "Existential Angst"

If you have to redo it now, get one of the vented radiant-pipe heaters. There's a burner box with a small draft blower at one end, a 20' long black pipe and reflector for over the workbench and your favorite machines, and then it turns up and vents through the roof.
And the fumes & water vapor go Up and Out.
That, or a Modine "Hot Dawg" style Vented unit heater.

Electric heat is just plain stupid, between the low efficiency and the high cost of electricity most places - Unless you're plugged straight into Hoover Dam at a deep discount.
The average coal or NG fired power plant burns fuel to make electricity and loses half the energy as waste, then the utilities waste another15% getting it to you, and you lose another 10% converting it back into heat... Burn the gas into heat yourself, and save on all the losses and paying all the middle-men.
And electric lights are a bad way to generate heat too - they do, but you really should have them for the light and a heater for heat...
--<< Bruce >>--
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"Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)" wrote:

Those things work amazingly well even in a place with open loading dock doors and 5F wind blowing through. You're still comfortable in a T-shirt.

I use electric heat in my shop, just a recycled air handler with electric heat, only running half of the 20KW bank. I'll eventually reconnect the A/C as well. It may not be the most efficient, but it is the most cost effective since the equipment cost me nothing. Also here in N. TX the heating and A/C seasons are fairly short for shop use, since it doesn't have to match the same temps as the house, just be comfortable. In the winter 60F is fine when I'm working out there and set down to 50F when I'm not. In the summer 90F is fine when it's 106F out.
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On 12/28/2011 18:23, Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable) wrote:

The last 10% is incorrect. Electrical heating has definitely 100% efficiency in a closed room. All wiring loss, all radiant loss, everything turns into heat eventually inside the room.
Depends on the cost of gas if it makes sense..
At least here in Finland : - burning gas : 0.22 euro/kWh (about 2.5euro/kg in 10kg tanks, 12.8kWh/kg, 90% efficiency) - burning light oil : 0.16 euro/kWh (about 1.1 euro/litre, 10kWh/litre, 70% efficiency) - direct electrical heating : 0.11euro/kWh
So here, it is actually cheapest to heat with electricity.
I have an air-to-air heat pump running with electricity.. Saves about 20% electricity compared to direct heating with resistive heaters. Pays for itself in 5 years. Doesn't save more because there's not so much energy in air to pump when it is less than -10C and it certainly is a few months a year..
Kristian Ukkonen.
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Anytime a flame contacts something, something can happen. The cleanest unit will just have a blue flame not contacting anything. When a flame contacts a heat transferring thing, combustion becomes worse. A yellow flame is that much worse if hits ceramic logs. Room air contaminants can make it much worse.
Couple years ago, ran kerosene for over two days, and we were suffering.
Was that chinese ceramic?
Greg
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