Utility drill: corded or cordless?

Page 2 of 2  
On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 22:32:27 -0700, Prof Wonmug wrote:

Hitachi 3/8" with lithium ion batteries for around the house use. I have the 14.4volt model and love it. If you are going to use it for work I would suggest a DeWalt 1/2 inch 18volt with rapid charger. I've seen one in action and was impressed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/15/2010 11:33 AM, A. Baum wrote:

I have the 12V Hitachi and am not crazy about it. Low speed is too high, I wind up using the 18V for driving screws. I do like the size and weight.
Jeff
If you are going to use it for work I

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Prof Wonmug wrote the following:

My 18 volt Ryobi Ni-Cd 3/8" cordless is still going strong. I have had it for years and is the first drill I pick up when something has to be drilled or screwed. There is always one battery in the drill and one in the charger, so I'm ready to go at any time. I also have an 18 volt Makita Li-On 3/8" cordless hammer drill. I also have a corded 3/8" Craftsman VSR, and a corded Craftsman 1/2" VSR. The one bad thing about corded drills is that in about 90% of the time, if the job is not in the workshop, you have to bring an extension cord to the job site. A couple of years ago when Ryobi went to Li-On batteries, HD was selling the older 2 per pack One+ (One Plus) Ni-Cd batteries for less than half price and I bought a set.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Same situation with me. I tossed about $200 in cordless drills because they were never ready when I needed them. They were gifts in the first place, and got little use. Got pissed when both batteries I had for a Craftsman 12v wouldn't hold or take a charge when I needed it. Had to use my VSR 1/2" hammer drill to drill some 1/8" holes. None of my cordless drills were high quality, but I just decided it was easier to plug a drill in than deal with batteries. I'm not a contractor and don't need cordless.
Bought a corded 3/8" Craftsman for $39 (keyless chuck VSR) Now if I want to drill and screw I just chuck the drill in the 3/8" and the driver in the 1/2". No problem tangling cords or anything. The Craftsman is fine - lots of torque - but I'm no drill connoisseur. Probably most will do. If you go Sears, you might wait for sales.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/14/2010 10:32 PM Prof Wonmug spake thus:

Yes; forget new drills. Get an older one, probably about the same vintage as your Craftsman, but reversible.
My favorite drill used to be my Craftsman, which is probably a lot like yours (3/8", all metal) but reversible. I've replaced the speed control on it, then later did an almost complete drill-ectomy on it when I found one just like mine at the local recycled-goods store for $10. Still works fine.
But my best drill nowadays is the Milwaukee "hybrid" that was given to me by a friend/client. I say "hybrid" because it has a metal body but a plastic handle (orange). That thing has so much torque it's amazing; almost as much as some 1/2" drills. I only have two complaints about it: poor placement of the reversing switch (just above the trigger), making it easy to reverse the drill unintentionally, and it's so strong and heavy that it coasts for a long time after releasing the switch. Other than that it's perfect.
If you have a place that sells recycled or salvaged stuff, look for a drill of this vintage. Chances are it'll still work, and work well.
So far as chucks go, I actually prefer a keyed chuck. I attach the key to the cord so it's always there, and am confident that the bit is being held securely. Small price in inconvenience here.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

From what you said, but a corded one. If a battery sits, it just dies away. Of course if your Craftsman is still working, why buy anything? It's probably made better than any new ones.
And chuck keys are a GOOD thing. I hate those keyless chucks. They dont hold well on any tough work. Just have a SPARE chuck key on hand. I misplaced mine recently and I got my spare. The next day I bought another one, and the day after I found the lost one. Oh well, it was only a couple bucks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Oct 2010 18:00:22 -0500, jw wrote:

The keyless one on my Dewalt's served me well so far - I was expecting it to be junk, too, but I can't think of a time when it's failed to work (a handful of times where it's slipped because I hadn't tightened it enough, but none where it just hasn't coped)
I really hate cordless drills, though - give me a cord any day.

Do hand-held drills with chuck keys come with somewhere on the drill body to store the key? Seems like bad design if they don't. My bench drill has a nice indentation in the top of the case, so the key lives there when I'm not using it.
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.