Using Extension Cord with Freezer

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Hello,
    I just purchased a 7 CFT Magic Chef Freezer from the Home Depot. The place that I want to place it is about 6 feet from the nearest electrical outlet. Reading the manual it states not to use extension cords of any kind. Is the reason they put this on for fear the consumer will try to use a standard electric cord and cause a fire or is it something else? I plan on getting a 15A with a 14 gauge or 12 gauge wire. The line that it is attached to goes to a 15 amp circuit and seeing that it hasn't tripped he line while it is running I should be ok. Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks, Nick
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On Sep 20, 10:55 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

Yeah - They're worried you would use a lamp cord type extension cord, or one of those kight-weight orange or green outdoor extension cords that are fine for small leafb;lowers, but not much else. If you gat an extension cord with 14 ga wire, it should be ok, a 12 gauge wire would be better. If it is only 10 feet or so long, it is not any different than if the freezer was on a circuit that was 10 ft feet farther from the circuit breaker or fuse box. Make sure the prongs and the female end of the extension cord are secure, ir, the mating plugs are making good contact to eliinate any overrrrrheating at the plug-in points. Then check it out once in a while to see that things are still fine.
Good idea to ask, you are on the right track.
Bob Hofmann
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replying to hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net, Dennis Osgood wrote:

I had an 11,000 BTU window air conditioner hooked to a 100 ft extension cord because I needed an additional 4-5 feet of cord. The a/c was not working well at all. An electrician told me that the extension cord was the problem. Get rid of the cord (or shorten it considerably to only what I needed) and it will work. I did, and it worked great.
Just last week my daughter said that her new freezer was not freezing -- her food was thawed out but still cold enough to cook. I looked at the freezer and her husband had hooked a 100 ft extension cord to the freezer because the freezer cord was 2 ft too short. I remembered what the electrician said about my a/c unit, and we moved the freezer to a new outlet. The food was frozen in just a few hours.
I have read many articles both pro and con about voltage drops in extension cords. Apparently not everyone agrees with the established theories of electrical engineering. The electrician never did tell me why the extension cord was the problem. All I know is that removing the extension cord caused both the a/c and the freezer to work well.
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 9:44:04 AM UTC-4, Dennis Osgood wrote:

You've identified the problem, voltage drop. The conductors have to be sized for the load. An 11,000 BTU AC is a large load. It also has a large initial startup current. That current over a 100 ft 16 gauge extension has considerable voltage drop. If the extension cord was 10 or 12 gauge, it would work, but it's still not advisable. The issue should be much less with a modern fridge or freezer. They typically only pull ~90W or so. Bottom line you want to use a short extension cord that is heavy enough for the load.
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"trader_4" wrote in message Dennis Osgood wrote:

(

You've identified the problem, voltage drop. The conductors have to be sized for the load. An 11,000 BTU AC is a large load. It also has a large initial startup current. That current over a 100 ft 16 gauge extension has considerable voltage drop. If the extension cord was 10 or 12 gauge, it would work, but it's still not advisable. The issue should be much less with a modern fridge or freezer. They typically only pull ~90W or so. Bottom line you want to use a short extension cord that is heavy enough for the load.
90 watts where the heck did you get that info. Must efficient unit will draw about 10 Amps. that mean 1200 watts on 120 volts. for AC unit #14 wire with max length of 10 feet above that length you should and must go #12 wire. service for apx. 50 feet if you run any AC on cord and wire or receptacle is getting warm consider safety and install larger supply "IT is a must"
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I think that 90 watts is for a modern refrigerator.
I think we all agree that extension cords are ok, but they should be made out of wire that is large enough so the voltage drop is very low. The longer the cord, the larger the wire. Wire less than about # 14 should not be used on high current loads at any length.
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On 6/23/2015 5:19 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

90W is for a very old fridge. I just looked at the specs of a 33 cu ft side by side and it is 8.5A an 18 cu ft top freezer was 6A
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 6:30:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

No, you have it backwards. Fridges haven't gone up in power, they went way down. I replaced my 20 year old one that was using about 250W with a side by side that's bigger, think it's 31 cu ft, the new one uses 90W. The 8.5A that you're looking at may be the max, instantaneous startup current. I've looked at a new freezer too during Sandy with my KillaWatt meter. It pulled ~350 W for a few seconds, then quickly started declining. After a couple mins, it was down to ~100W.
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 6:37:55 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

Thinking about it some more, that 8.5A is probably due to the defrost heater that only comes on once a day? That would give you a 1000W heater, which seems reasonable.
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On 06/23/2015 05:30 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
[snip]

My refrigerator (ordinary size side-by-side) is about 6 years old. When I first got it running after the power outage it was drawing about 1A. Power had been out about 15 hours, so I'd expect the compressor would be running then.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
  Click to see the full signature.
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You also should know what defrost current is. My 20 year fridge takes about 12 amps.
I use a 100 foot 14 gauge cord for small camper at camp. It has a 5kbtu air conditioner. Seems to run fine.
My compressor didn't start in the garage using Micky mouse hookup. I now use the wired receptacles using 10 gauge, 85 foot.
Greg
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On Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 11:17:16 PM UTC-5, Gz wrote:

Suggestion: use the compressor set-up when camping...100' of #14 is foolish to use, whether it works or not!
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I bought the extension for power failures LOL I always keep it handy. One off my garage is 100 foot 12 gauge. I thought it migh have been priced wrong when I paid $25 at my local hardware.
Greg
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On 6/29/2015 3:47 AM, gregz wrote:

How does it work during a power failure? Is it pre-charged? I imagine you plug it into itself so the electricity does not leak out.
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On 6/29/2015 11:31 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

This reply has totally got to be deserving of some kind of award. I've seldom been so inspired.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 4:59:38 PM UTC-4, tony944 wrote:

It's widely available, just look. That's what refrigerators and freezers made in the last decade or so consume.

Are you thinking AC instead of fridge/freezer? I said fridge/freezer pulls 90W and that an 11,000 BTU AC is a "large load".
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On 06/23/2015 04:48 PM, trader_4 wrote:
[snip]

The 5000 BTU AC I was using on my generator after last month's tornado was drawing about 4A.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 8:44:04 AM UTC-5, Dennis Osgood wrote:

You think old Bob will show up to read your reply to his SEVEN YEAR OLD post????
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On 6/23/2015 9:44 AM, Dennis Osgood wrote:

The size of the wire is more important than the length. If you used a 3' cord with 18 gauge wire it would be more of a problem than 100 foot cord with #10 wire. Think of the wire as a pipe. You can only get so much juice through it so bigger is better.
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Except the water analogy for electricity doesn't hold water, when you stretch it far enough. A 1 foot chunk of #18 cord could actually provide LESS voltage drop than 100 feet of heavier cable.
The resistance of 1 foot of #18 is roughly the same as 2.5 feet of #14 or 6.4 feet of #10 - so 100 feet of #10 will definitely drop more voltage than 3 feet of #18 - as long as the current draw does not excede the current carrying capacity of the #18
With stranded cord, that is about2-3 amps for the #18 cabtire or zip cord - or 9-10 amps for solid wire, or about 5 amps for 7 strand
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