Using #14 wire on a 20A if plugged in

Page 2 of 2  
so i guess that 350' of 12/2 i have laying on the ground to my barn is not quite kopasetic?
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ask the fire department.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The fire dept would prefer we don't use ANY extension cord for any reason, made of any material.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think you can put a plug on romex; it isn't approved for that use. As a practical matter though, what is going to happen? To be dangerous you would have to have a overload on the 14 that isn't enough to trip the breaker; yet is enough to start a fire. While not impossible, it is most unlikely; especially if the the circuit is dedicated to your little fan. Its a judgement call.
The one time I was in a similar situation I changed the breaker, since there was no need for 20a.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is the only violation. Without trying to start a flame war I would point out that on a dedicated motor circuit #14 can be used at it's 20a rating and if the motor has suplimental overload protection the breaker could be up to 40a. (1 HP single phase 120v)     That is a question that is usually on the inspector test.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.