Unvented gas logs question


It would be great if a professional with specific knowlege of this subject could answer this question.
I have read in many places that one should never leave unvented gas logs on when they are unattended, but I cannot find out why. I would presume that the reason(s) must be related to CO, O2 depletion, and/or fire.
Our unvented gas logs were installed in a modular home by the modular company and strictly according to the manufacturers instructions.
The combustion products from these logs are disbursed throught an immediate open area of about 15,300 cubic ft, plus up a stairway where the hot air really flows to an additional 18,000 cubic feet. The total volume of air in the living area of the home is about 40,500 cubic feet.
The logs are equiped with an O2 depletion sensor. A CO detector placed near the logs has never measured any CO. The area around the fire place does not become close to being too hot. The logs run on propane and produce 21,000-34,000 BTU/hour. We ALWAYS run it on the 21,000 setting. We have never detected any order
QUESTION: Is there REALLY any significant danger in running the logs unattended? If so, is the reason one or more of CO, O2, fire, or something else?
Many thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

...
Basically, it's a CYA disclaimer for a general statement.
Specifically, it could be any of the above.
Realistically, it's common sense.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well, mebbe not so common sense, if one has faith in all the protection, sensors, etc. BUT, a little practical paranoia goes a long way.... I don't leave even electric heaters unattended! I'm not crazy about my gas furnace cycling on and off with no one in the house....
But without a doubt CYA....
But a note on "unvented":
I was thrilled to find some traditional gas "radiant" ventless heaters. So I bought two, for my shop, ran gas lines, the whole 9....
What a disappointment -- indeed, altho apparently one doesn't outright DIE, one does choke a bit.... goodgawd.... And the water vapor can *soak* the wall above the heater. You need a dehumidifer mounted right on top of the unvented gas heater.
You don't really choke-choke, but goddamm, you can -- at least *I* can -- literally *taste* the resulting air.
I don't think CO or oxygen depletion were involved, as I'm pretty sensitive to CO, and the place is drafty, but the unpleasantness of these ventless gas heaters was distinct, even on low.
Funny, tho, the stove doesn't have this unpleasantness that these heaters had, so it might have been some contribution from the radiant ceramic element, as well. Water vapor will *always* be a problem, however -- less so if the place is so dry you actually *need* some moisture.
Buyer beware.
--
EA



>
> --
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In my situation, with the large volume of air and heat pumps also providing substantiql heating, our air remains fairly dry as it does in the 6000 sq ft house next door with 10 foot ceilings and they run theirs all day long.
On Sat, 2 Jan 2010 14:44:32 -0500, "Existential Angst"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I grew up in a home that used unvented natural gas space heaters. If you have a gas range, as many do, it is unvented. Never a physical or mental problem. [Look! A squirrel!]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 2, 1:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

How leaky is your house? Maybe there is an air inlet somewhere that helps feed the fireplae.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

People die when the unusual happens, not the common every day things. Make sure your CO detector never fails and you never fail to hear it. You could insulate or weatherize your house done day and die the next from CO.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 02 Jan 2010 14:21:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well, I might leave the room unattended, but certainly would not leave the house. No combustion is 100%, so for sure you are getting some CO.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.