Turning Brick to drywall

Hi everyone,
I have a nice large family room/breakfast room addition. The issue is that one wall is all brick (use to be the back of the house). The brick wall is 12 feet high and 30 feet long.
I would rather that wall have the look of drywall, not brick. Any solutions? I could put up dry wall but then I assume I'd need to put up studs and attach them to the brick? Would drywall mud work?
Any other creative ideas?
Thanks! Manta
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On 24 May 2005 05:37:55 -0700, "Corporate Monkey"

Construction adhesive. I know a few people who attached drywall to a concrete wall this way many years back with no problems. They did not use studs in this one area because it would have made the clearance to a stairway less than 3' and that would have been against code.
The only downfall with this method is if you ever want to tear it down. That could be a time consuming job and the brick will never look right again.
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That's correct. Firring strips, anyway - not necessarily studs.

Sure - over the joints in your drywall. You're not thinking of putting drywall mud right over the brick, are you?

It might work to have the wall plastered. But talk to a plaster contractor. That is *not* a do-it-yourself job: making an entire wall look flat and smooth is an art unto itself, that requires considerable practice.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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You frame out the wall with 2 x 3 or 2 x 4, attaching the header and sill plate to the ceiling and floor. Add insulation with vapor barrier and then drywall. This is a good time to add receptacles too.
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On Tue, 24 May 2005 13:50:11 GMT, in alt.home.repair RE: Re: Turning

That's the solutions that probably makes the most sense.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Why would one need a vapor barrier and insulation between two living spaces?
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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On 24 May 2005 05:37:55 -0700, in alt.home.repair RE: Turning Brick

How about stucco? However, that's really not a DIY project.
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On 24 May 2005 05:37:55 -0700, "Corporate Monkey"

If I am picturing this correctly, you have built an addition onto the back of your house so that exterior back wall is now an interior wall, and you want to drywall it.
There's no magic to this.
You can glue the drywall right to the brick, using PL Premium or other appropriate construction adhesive. Make sure the brick is clean and use a few Tapcon screws to hold each sheet in place.
There is no need to insulate or vapour barrier, it is now an interior wall. You would use studs or furring strips only if 1) the brick wall is defective (ie bowed, out of plumb, whatever) or 2) if you wish to run plumbing or electrical on that wall.
Ken
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WOW! Thanks for the advice. I like the idea of glueing to the brick. It sounds easier than putting up studs or firring strips..but is it easier?
Let's say I want to put up studs since it is a large wall and I want to do electrical outlets...how do I attach the studs to the brick? I'm a newbie to alot of this..so if possible, pease be as descriptive as possible. What type of nails...screws..etc.
Thanks! Manta
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Did you read my reply from yesterday? The one that said to nail the header to the ceiling and the plate to the floor? No, I guess you didn't. You don't attach the studs to the brick. If you cannot read, I doubt you should be swinging a hammer as they can hurt people. . Use the nails with heads on the header to ceiling, the ones needed for the plate depends on what material the floor it. FWIW, it is "a lot", not "alot"
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Actually...I didn't read the whole thread...my apologies but thanks for taking time to write the details. I can read..but I still doubt my ability with a hammer! Thank God I don't have to use a nail gun!!
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