Trying to identify a component in a well pressure system

Darling husband has been meaning to fix a leak in our well water system. The leak continues so I am now looking into how to repair the leak. The part leaking is on the pipe coming from the well - it has a small knob on it - and is covered in rust. I went to the local home store with a photo - but they do not get into well systems much so they could not help me.
I think this is a pressure regulator or over pressure device.
I have put up a photo of it at imageshack.us [URL=http:// img372.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img0606sc0.jpg]
http:// img372.imageshack.us/img372/7523/img0606sc0.th.jpg [/URL]
Could someone identify what this is - so I can order in the correct part?
http://img372.imageshack.us/img372/7523/img0606sc0.th.jpg
Thanks, Cindy
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From the small photo I can't see much, but it looks like a pressure regulator to me. The know is used to adjust the pressure. Normally, there is a metal tag giving the pressure range it covers, probably about 50 psi. A plumbing supply house can help.
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Here is a larger version of the photo. There is so much rust on it that I can't see anything resembling a metal tag. My guess is it rusted off long ago.
http://img372.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img0606gi7.jpg
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wrote in message Here is a larger version of the photo. There is so much rust on it that I can't see anything resembling a metal tag. My guess is it rusted off long ago.
http://img372.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img0606gi7.jpg
The part on the right is what a pressure regulator uses to adjust. The round portion on the front is a bit different than most though, but there are other types that all do the same thing.
My concern though, would be taking the pipe apart. With all of that rust you may have to replace a section of it as things can easily break. While your intentions are admirable, there are times it is smart to pay a pro. At least have a backup plan in case of problems.
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On Sun, 11 May 2008 19:23:44 -0700 (PDT), Cindy

I consider myself to be a somewhat capable plumber. I wouldn't touch that one for all the frogs in the fish pond. The rusty pipes are going to be a bear to get apart and the bottom pipe doesn't look like it is in very good condition so it is likely that something will break during the repair job.
Where does the bottom pipe go? Could you possibly replace the entire assembly instead of trying to fix this particular piece? If not I would call a plumber on this one.
Steve B.
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On Sun, 11 May 2008 19:00:20 -0700 (PDT), Cindy

I can't really see much in that picture, too small, but my guess is it is a check valve. This looks like a shallow well with the pump above ground (1.5 or 2" casing?) You need a check valve to keep the pump primed. Since that whole casing is rusted out where that part is, you may be cutting it off and putting on some kind of compression fitting, then a new check valve.
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On May 11, 9:23pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This is a submersible pump & it is unknown how deep the well is.
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Look closely at the leaks, 3 of them, it looks like dissimilar metals are causing a galvanic reaction, like copper to galvanised steel is causing the issue. Correct piping might be the only issue to fix.
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Are bottom and top pipe rubber, if so cut the rubber and throw all the metal pipe away since rust is even at the top and start over.
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Agree. Replacing all the pipe is the only sane thing to do. Whatever the object is, it isn't needed in a simple well system.
Harry K
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I have never seen anything like that. I have to agree with Edwin though and guess at a pressure regulator.
Whatever it is, it is not needed in a simple well system.
Check valve? Being a submersible pump, it has a check valve included in it to keep the tank from draining back. Thus there is no need for one up top. Also applies to a top mount pump as the check valve is normally the foot valve (the entire 'down' pipe and pump has to be kept full of water)
Pressure regulator? Why? The pressure switch that turns the pump on and off regulates the system pressure between cut-in/cut-off.
Some sort of 'snifter valve'? Top of the well pumps needed some method to keep adding air into the tank (pre bladder tank technology).
I also would only touch that mess with a well planned fall back position, that being the need to pull up enough pipe going down well to replace the entire thing up top. What the picture shows is a 'non- repairable mess' without replacing pipe. It also looks like it is on the verge ot total disintegration.
Harry K
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