Touch up eggshell paint

I primed and applied two coats of a nice blue Ben Moore eggshell latex to some walls. Subsequently I noticed some spots that needed a little touch-up. No problem, plenty of paint left. So I got out a brush and painted over a few spots. I was quite surprised when that dried, to find that the touched-up spots came out significantly paler than everywhere else.Asked back at the friendly paint store, where I was told that "oh yes, eggshell always does that. You can't touch up an eggshell finish -- you can only repaint the whole wall". He seemed surprised I didn't know that. Well I had no idea, and I've never had this kind of problem before.
So, is that correct, and if so is there no other recourse? Is it worth trying with a roller (on the grounds that that's how the first two coats were applied)? I don't want to make it any worse. And, if is it correct, what's the "true" color of the paint -- the original, which I rather liked, or the conspicuous lighter spots, which I don't like as well?
Any observations welcome,
...Robert
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Try a roller. I have a small one for touch up jobs. If you originally used a roller, you should touch up with a roller. A brush can cause some visible differences in the finish.
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Robert Noble wrote:

The touched up area was paler? Sounds like you didn't get the paint mixed well when you touch up.
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it is always been my understanding that eggshell is nearly impossible to touch up. that is a big advantage of flat.
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with flat you can wash it !!!! mike piper got the best way to fix it up

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It's true that flat is easier than more glossy finishes, but by no means does it mean it can't be touched up. If so, no one would ever be able to touch up semi gloss trim, and the like. Ridiculous.
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jeffc wrote:

I agree. I use mostly semi-gloss outside and inside but my walls are textured. I have touched up yellow after several years (woodgrain, pressboard siding) and couldn't tell the touch up from the rest. Last fall I touched up some bad areas of gray and you couldn't tell where I added paint. I use a brush on outside work.
Inside my walls are a heavy knock-down, so that helps and we use mostly light colors but one bedroom is blue. No one can tell where I have added paint on either the walls or the trim.
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On Sat, 1 Apr 2006 22:32:22 -0500, "Robert Noble"

Yes it's true. And darker colors flash worse than light ones. Paint the entire wall again.
Is it worth

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No, that's ridiculous. What surprises me is the crap some of these supposed experts will say. You can, in fact, touch up eggshell paint, although some care is required. It is the sheen, not the color, that can cause problems. Brush marks look different from roller, so you must either use a mini roller to touch up, or "dab" the paint on with the the "pointy" end of the bristles. It sounds like your paint was not completely mixed, or you got some of the white base (perhaps around the lid) mixed in with the paint, or the paint was not colored properly to begin with for all gallons. If you have more than one gallon, try some paint from the other gallon.
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