Tossing a charged Capacitor in the Bathtub

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wrote:

500mF (mF = millifarad)is one half of a farad. or do you mean uf;microfarad? milliF caps are rare.
OTOH,"MF",capital M,is MegaFarad. M = mega,m = milli,mmF = microfarads(uF) in the old notation.

there are polarized electrtolytics(leads marked +/-) and non-polarized caps(electrolytics are marked NP,non-electrolytic caps are not marked). both are used in all sorts of electronics. then there are caps that can handle higher currents,those are the sort used in motor circuits.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On Jan 27, 5:54 pm, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

In manufacturing where many large inductors (motors) are used, the electric grid has to use huge capacitors to put the current back in phase.
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 20:14:39 -0800 (PST), Bob_Villa

I have noticed some things on power poles that look like pole transformers without any secondaries and they are smaller. The HV line just enters and exists then midway to a farm or industrial complex. Maybe those are the caps. I never understood their purpose.
Besides industry, large farms have lots of power hungry motors. I just operate a small farm, but even I have hay elevators and augers and other devices with fairly large 110 or 220 volt motors.
Also, in reply to others speaking in electronics terms I am familiar with non polarized as well as electrolytic caps. I worked on a lot of electronics when I was a kid. Mostly tube stuff back then, and back then, mf meant micro-farad, and mmf meant miro-micro-farad. Oddly enough they were also called condensors in those days. I still fart around with a few home repairs of electronic stuff, but these days finding parts is a challenge, if not impossible. Especially ICs. That takes the fun out of it.
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On Jan 28, 4:08 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Power grid capacitor bank: http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photos-capacitor-bank-image685808
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On 1/28/2012 4:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

If they are wired in series on the distribution wiring they are sectionalizers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sectionalizer is a not-great description.
They take the place of a fuse, and are always downstream from a recloser. Reclosers are also wired in series, but are much larger.
PF correction caps are wired phase-to-phase.
--
bud--

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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:53:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I don't think direct current tingles.

I call them polarized and non-polarized.

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There are polarized, back to back polarized caps used for ac, like in speaker crossover networks and other things. Most caps used in electronics are ac or dc, meaning non polarized, except some non polarized have mark to indicate outer foil. The others are polarized because they have a liquid filling to obtain high capacity.
Dc is typically more dangerous. I still remember grabbing hold of a high current 500 vdc source in my ham transmitter. I also remember sticking my finger in the antenna socket of my spark gap transmitter, of a toy bus I had when young.
My mother told me of the day I was pouring water into a lamp socket, and i said it made a funny noise.
Greg
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wrote:

I got a kick out of feeding either AC or reverse DC into a small electrolytic capacitor. Something less than an inch long will go off like a firecracker and the metal covering will fly across the room. In those days, I had lots of used capacitors stripped off old electronic (nixie tube type) calculators.
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On 1/27/2012 9:11 PM, EXT wrote:

Reminds me of the time I brought the little kid out of my boss. I had him hooking up small electrolytic caps to 120VAC via an extension cord and out a door. We kept increasing the size and it didn't take too long before they didn't explode, they just tripped the 20amp breaker. Never forget when he told me "what ever you do, don't tell my wife!".
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 21:11:33 -0500, EXT wrote:

Heh, we used to do that too at school in the electronics lab - 240VAC would make them go bang quite nicely.

I love Nixie stuff. I had a big old calculator (IME 86) with a Nixie display for a while, but didn't keep it when I move to the US (decided it was too heavy to ship). Hopefully at some point I'll find something similar this side of the Atlantic!
I did pull some Nixies from some old grain analysis equipment, which will probably end up as a clock display one day (possibly one based on neon tube logic)
cheers
Jules
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Yeah, I've still got an old nixie calculator that I use in my workshop. It is big and heavy enough that it doesn't get lost, and it works no matter how much sawdust accumulates on it. Believe it or not, it was made by Sony. Some of the display tubes are getting a little weak.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

And most people would be wrong. The person in the tub would have to be touching the toaster, or whatever, thrown in the tub. Even then, if the internals of the appliance didn't fry, the circuit breaker would trip. At most, if touching the device, the bather would experience maybe a quarter-second of jolt.
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Robert Green wrote:

Okay, I stand corrected. Thanks for the new information.
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Early 80's? That's around the time a good friend of ours died from a hair dryer in the tub, maybe as late a 1986. The breaker didn't trip, and of course that was before widespread use of GFCIs.
The body is basically a sack of salt water. It probably conducts better than the bathwater. I'm sure the plumbing as well as the fixtures was metallic. I don't know what would happen today when both drain and supply lines are likely to be plastic.
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:53:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

The capacitor would be shorted and unless it actually touched the person in a tub, no harm would be done.
As for AC and DC, they ALL charge with DC, and DC only.
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 22:40:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As much as I worked on electronics as a kid, I never know if an AC cap (motor starting cap) would hold a charge. If nothing else, this thread answered that it dont.
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On 1/28/2012 5:14 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Well you got some bad info.
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wrote:

While you might say they charge with DC only, a capacitor will charge on an AC circuit. It depends on where in the cycle the capacitor is removed. It can be charged anywhere from 0 to the maximum peak line voltage. It is being charged and discharged 120 times a second for standard house current in the USA. Half the time one plate will be positive with respect to the other and half it will be negative.
When saying AC or DC capacitors, that is very misleading. The polarized and nonpolarized is more correct.
Connect and disconnect a motor starting capacitor enough times and it will have a charge stored in it during one of the times.
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:09:02 -0800, "Bill"

You are going to bet your life on that untruth / half truth.
Pure water containing no ions is an excellent insulator, but not even "deionized" water is completely free of ions. Water undergoes auto-ionization in the liquid state. Further, because water is such a good solvent, it almost always has some solute dissolved in it, most frequently a salt. If water has even a tiny amount of such an impurity, then it can conduct electricity readily, as impurities such as salt separate into free ions in aqueous solution by which an electric current can flow

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On Jan 27, 11:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Depends on how conductive the water is. Unless you are in a tub of distilled water it will discharge. The more conductive the water the faster.
Jimmie
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