Tossing a charged Capacitor in the Bathtub

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On Jan 27, 11:53am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Maybe, just maybe, if it was a *flux capacitor* you would be transported back in time before you asked such a silly question...
~~ Evan
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Maybe the Mormon will try it and will lose him forever! *L*
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Naah, might go to see Moroni, and hear some trumpet symphonies. Him and the heavenly chorous can be kind of pleasant evening listening.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Maybe the Mormon will try it and will lose him forever! *L*
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 15:44:27 -0800 (PST), Bob_Villa
And for anyone, if the person has life insurance, they cant die at all. (at least that's what the insurance crooks, (I mean salesmen), say!!!
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:53:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Like to live on the edge do you <grin> ??? I'd like to ask you next to test gravity by jumping off your roof but I won't. I think I already know the answer.
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wrote:

I already know that answer. Last year I stepped off the roof onto an aluminum ladder and the ladder buckled and I went with it. The doctor in the ER said I was lucky to land on my ass. Nothing was broke but I sure had a sore ass for awhile, along with the middle of my back that first hit a lawn chair. The chair did not survive, it was crushed.
I'll never own another aluminum ladder!!!!
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 17:43:15 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Altho we don't know each other, you know I was just joking. On a serious note, just glad you are okay and now I wished I didn't make that roof joke. In your case, maybe it wasn't so funny. Sorry.
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wrote:

No problem. I knew you were joking. I wish I was. The ladder was old and had some dings and dents, but I've used it for years with those dings. I'm around 200lbs, so not really overweight (well, maybe 10 lbs). I know the snow under the ladder was much at fault. the legs probably slid in different directions, and both vertical legs buckled. Down I came. No, that was not fun! I had a wooden ladder snap once, but the sound gave me warning, and I slowly came down and did not fall. This damn thing just buckled in one second or less. with no sounds or anything to notice. Oddly enough I fell faster than the ladder because the damn ladder landed on top of me, and whacked me in the face, so that added a black eye and cheek to the damages. A broken off piece of one leg actually punctured the aluminum siding on the house too. It took me 10 or 15 minutes to get up, then I got pissed and threw the ladder. Thats when I realized I needed to go to the hospital amd got someone to drive me there.
Note, the ladder was on a wooden deck covered with and inch or two of snow. It would have likely held up if it was on the lawn snow instead (and probably not hurt as much either).
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 17:43:15 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Were you over its rating? Or near it?

But be sure not to buy wrought iron lawn furniture.
Doug, lots of possible reasons he did not answer, but I don't think your wise crack was offensive. No one thought you meant for him to hurt himself.
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On Jan 27, 11:53am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

That's how it works in the movies. In reality, to be electrocuted the person in the tub would have to be in the path of enough of the current to kill them. That depends on many factors. At one extreme, if the appliance went into one end of the tub near a ground source like perhaps the drain, while the person was standing in the other end, not touching anything else, it's unlikely they would be electrocuted.
On the other hand, if you're holding a grounded faucet with one hand and trying to pick up the appliance that fell in the tub with the other, that's a lot more likely to produce a bad result.
As for a cap, since the current path would be from one terminal to the other, it's unlikely enough current would make it through anyone's body in the tub. Unless they were grabbing the cap....
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On Jan 27, 11:53am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I don't know what will happen when you toss it in the water, but I know what will happen when a dead man stick is used to short the terminals of a large cap charged up to 7 or 8 KV DC.
A dead man stick is a device with a wooden handle with a hooked rod threaded into the handle and a braided strap with a clip on the end. It was used to both ground towers and other electrical equipment or to pull an energized human from said equipment.
At a minimum, shoting out the cap will cause a bang and a spark that is sure to strike fear into the hearts of most mortal men. In some cases, it will blow 4 inches of threaded rod out of the hardwood handle.
We used to do it quite often when I was in the Coast Guard as training/ warning exercise.
We had large oil filled caps (5F) that ran at 15 - 20 KV DC in the LORAN transmitter buildings. We didn't want non-Transmitter Techs in the building without one of us present. As new men would arrive at the station, part of the orientation meeting included a demo where we would use a Hi-Pot to charge up a cap to at least 5KV DC, turn out the lights and then short it out with a dead man stick. One time we went a bit overboard with the Hi-Pot and I was left holding a smoking hard wood handle while my buddy retrieved the metal rod from across the room. We grabbed another dead man stick and still got quite a bang out the cap since it didn't completely discharge before blowing up the other dead man stick.
That one even scared me!
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 09:56:12 -0800, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Effect of dielectric absorption, possibly? You short it briefly, it discharges, but then a small portion of the original charge level appears to come back moments later...
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric_absorption)
cheers
Jules
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On Jan 27, 2:44pm, Jules Richardson

I am familiar with that phenomenon, although in this situation, I'm pretty sure it was the result of a partial discharge before the grounding rod exploded. Obviously I can't proof it, that's just my guess, based on prior experience with these large caps.
As part of our bi-weekly transmitter maintenance, we would ground the caps prior to removing the bus bars to get them out of the stand-by transmitter. Before they were even lifted out of the transmitter, we always put a shorting cable on them to stop them from charging back up due to both dielectric absorption and the strength of the signal from the on-air transmitter.
On the rare occasions that we forgot to do this (newbies!) or noticed a bad ground connection, we would use a dead man stick to short them before grabbing them. Even after a few hours, the discharge was minimal and we might get a little bit of a pop. In the case of the training demo, which was done in a rather neutral environment (the mess hall, a 1/4 mile from the transmitter building and tower) the resulting discharge was quire substantial, much higher than anything we'd seen in "real life".
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 09:56:12 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Damn, I never knew they even made caps that big. What was the actual size of that thing? (roughly). Or is there a photo on the web?
That sounds like quite a charge to see (literally) lol..
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On 1/27/2012 11:53 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

AC will kill as it causes fibrillation. DC will cause 1 pulse. That said, voltage levels, conductivity of the water will determine what will happen. But probably because the 2 poles are so close and the capacitor is not referenced to ground like the plugged in radio, as others said, current will go between the 2 capacitor leads. You will, with DC from the capacitor, produce hydrogen and oxygen bubbling off the 2 leads.
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On 1/27/2012 11:53 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Well there is one hell of a difference between 500mf and 1 farad. Although 1 Farad 5 volt caps have become quite small, one rated at 200 volts might bludgeon them to death if it hits them in the head, charged or not.

Lots of AC rated caps are used in electronics.
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wrote:

I can only think of two uses.
1. Speaker filter caps (in crossovers) 2. Line caps which are usually very small, such as .05mf. They go across the power line for voltage surges and spikes.
What are the other uses?
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In wrote:

If you're into analog engineering designs, there are enough to write entire books on them. Suggest you go research them; not worth trying to make up a list.
HTH,
Twayne`
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On 1/27/2012 6:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Oh millions of amplifiers have signal caps, video monitors, telephones, wireless doorbells, wireless anything...
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The most common application for a capacitor is to pass ac while blocking dc. Sometimes a polarized cap is used to pass ac, with a bias circuit to keep the polarized plates set. Other larger non polarized caps in the hundreds of mf in ac line and motor application. They typically have a 600 volt rating.
Greg
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