Tossing a charged Capacitor in the Bathtub

Page 2 of 4  
On Jan 28, 11:19 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Most residential circuits in the US are 220/110...110 being the center- tap of your utilities transformer. Things in the home such as, heat registers, clothes dryers, water heaters...tend to be 220 volts.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

His valid point was that it's very difficult to wind up with 240V involving your body. You'd have to be in the path of BOTH hots, which is fairly hard to do. Even if you're working on a 240V outlet that is energized or say a water heater, it's not likely you're going to grab one hot with one hand, the other hot with the other hand. That is what you'd have to do to get 240V. Typical would be to grab one hot while being grounded, in which case you'g be exposed to 120V. Same thing if one hot shorts to metal in say an ungrounded appliance. The case will be hot, but only at 120V.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Understood.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No, they're 240V and as I said, it's really two 120V circuits; very hard to get across both (accidentally).
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 29, 11:48 am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Actually, it's closer to 115/230.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/29/2012 12:33 PM, Bob_Villa wrote: ...

Actually... :)
ANSI Standard C84.1 specifies that the nominal voltage at the source should be 120 V and allow a range of 114 to 126 V (−5% to +5% Range A). Service Range B has wider tolerances.
Nameplate voltages are lower to recognize voltage drop from service to application point. IIRC, 115 is the corresponding value in current the Standard.
Historically 110, 115 and 117 volts have been used at different times and places in North America.
--
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The nominal spec is 120/240.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my experience I see more like 120-125 or up to 250 vac.
Greg
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They sell more electricity. ;-)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 23:57:04 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

I wonder how God thought to make us feel the pain of electricity when we didn't even have electricity when we evolved.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I meant electricity beyond the tiny amounts in our bodies.

But you can't feel the pain from your own electricity. I wonder why He made us feel pain from 110 volts. He probably knew we'd have that some day, but it means until 150 years ago, we could feel pain from it even t hough there wasn't any.
I'm not countring lightning.I don't think people avoid lightning for the same reasons.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/27/2012 5:57 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

When I was a kid in the 3rd grade I was fixing our old b/w console unplugged. I thought it would be safe. I discharged a capacitor and it gave me quite a shock through the rivets in the kitchen knife I was "fixing" the TV with. If you completed the circuit through both of your arms it could easily cause cardiac arrest (where the one hand in back pocket idea comes from). I learned my lesson. Always discharge capacitors!
this always cracks me up

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lozkT1zrIU

I love the sound the amp makes zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzt! LOL
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is pretty funny. Actually he probably felt nothing. He touched an input, the body picks up a lot of things especially the 60hz AC around him. That is what you hear. If you have a guitar cord plugged into an amp, and grab the tip if the plug on the guitar end, it will make that same sound. That amp volume was up pretty high too.
You can do the same with a home stereo using a cord plugged into an AUX, TAPE, or PHONO input, touch the end of the cord (you wont get a shock). (Phono inputs do this the best, they have an extra stage of amplification..... of course most modern amps probably dont have a phono input anymore).
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/28/2012 4:51 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

You might be right. He was smiling afterward. The timing is classic. The sound is what hurts.
It sounds like a 60 cycle hum but then why is he talking about discharging?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
my best friend bill is a retired electrical engineer.
as to the cap in the bathtub, he said since the easiest path would be close to the 2 terminals, so the victims shock would be minimal. he went on to say the entire tub would have a voltage gradient. similar to a lightning strike but of course far less.
on the GFCI question my buddy uses one as a backup water tank overflow shutdown.
You would get a minor shock but non lethal.......
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 27, 10:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

My assumption would be...there is no path to ground-so no one would get electrocuted. I wouldn't try it though!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 09:03:23 -0800 (PST), Bob_Villa

That's what I've been saying. Well, I said that if you throw a radio or heater in the bathtub, the current will go through the drity soapy water sononer than it will go thourhg the bathers body. What is dangerous is catching the radio when your hand is out of the tub and the only way to ground is through you.
I need volunteers to check this out. It pays 100 dollars per test, to you or your heirs.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you caught the radio before it hit the water, nothing would likely happen, since it's all plastic. Unless it's one of those real old tube sets with a metal cabinet and hot chassis.
Now this brings up another question. If the tub is plastic or fiberglass, water supply is pex or pvc and drain pipes are pvc, the tub is not grounded. I always wondered what would happen, since the person inside is not really grounded. (I mean is an AC plugged in device hits the water ????????

Careful, there might be somneone stupid enough on here to try :) Some other newsgroups there are definately stupid enough people... lol
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/27/12 11:03 AM, Bob_Villa wrote:

But the current flow doesn't have to be to ground. Think of a flashlight. The bulb will light even with a flashlight on a piece of non conducting material. The current flows from the negative to the positive poles through the bulb filament. It's about the voltage difference between two points. Electricity doesn't flow just through the path of least resistance. It flows through all available paths simultaneously. The amperage is in inverse proportion to the resistance in the circuit(s). A person in the tub could be in the circuit along with the water. The rule is called Kirchoff's (sp?) Law if you're interested. The EEs could explain it better probably.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.