toilet running

After flushing the toilet, it tends to continue to run. When it is flushed, the flapper is pulled up which allows the water to escape from the tank, while at the same time the float falls which opens the valve to fill the tank with water. All is well to this point.
The problem is the flapper generally doesn't go back down to the bottom in a timely fashion to plug the escape hole, and the source water begins to fill the tank again.
The source water apparently causes enough turbulence that it resists the flapper from falling to the bottom. If I were to manually stop the source water by lifting the float, the flapper drops to the bottom. I think it would be fixed if there were some way I could adjust the float to not allow the source valve to open until the flapper were much closer to closing. Yet, I've adjusted the float as far as it will go and that doesn't do it. I also think that if it were a slower flow of incoming water, it might work.
Could it be that someone has used the wrong replacement parts? Someone has added a 'weight' to the top of the flapper, but that doesn't really help, and I have an objection to relying on pure Kentucky windage to fix things.
Any help appreciated.
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The only thing that brings the flapper back down into the sealed position is the water level dropping low enough to expose the flapper above the surface of the water. Is the water escaping fast enough to expose the flapper? The inlet water should not overcome the emptying of the tank.

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The flapper does get above the surface of the water. But the water level never drops low enough for the flapper to close. The water level only goes down to a height of maybe a couple of inches.

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i would think the simplest solution may be to shut off your service valve, then open it just a tad. It'll fill slower, and quieter, and the lack of turbulance will probably solve your flapper dropping problem.
s

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It does indeed solve the problem. But I'm pretty sure the stop valves are not designed to restrict flow and wear out much faster when used for that purpose.

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J wrote:

I had a similar problem after I replaced the old float arm valve in one of our home toilets with a Fluidmaster valve.
There was such a strong flow of water coming through the bowl refill tube that it was flying down the overfill pipe, splashing off the horizontal surface below and bouncing up against the bottom of the flapper valve enough to keep it from closing.
I diagnosed the problem for what it was and "proved it" by placing a small C-clamp on on the refill tube and squeezing it down to reduce the flow through it. That got the flapper working normally.
I solved the problem "fer real" by sliding a few lengths of 1/16" wire solder inside the refill tube to create enough restriction to slow down the flow.
When I was done (and got through patting myself on the back.) I pinged Fluidmaster with an email describing what I'd encountered and received an almosr immediate reply which said they knew about that problem and asking for my postal address so they could send me a free "fix". I did that and shortly received a little plastic restrictor with barbed fittings on each side and instructions telling me to to cut the refill tube and stick it in.
I never got a round tuit and the pieces of wire solder are still inside the refill tube working just fine.
So, why not try pulling the refill tube out of the overflow tube temporarily and see if that lets the flapper drop normally.
If it does, you can figure out the rest....
Live and learn,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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This is one of the best newsgroup responses I've seen in a long time.
John
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wrote:

..why not just reduce the water flow by turning down the faucet handle under the toilet?
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I don't know about that one, but I've has valves that make a loud noise when only partly open.
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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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It works. But the manufacturer of the stop values say not to use them to restrict flow, as they wear out much faster.
you

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Thanks for a nice detailed response. I believe the problem you described is the same thing I'm experiencing. Yes, by removing the refill tube from the overflow tube, the flapper will reseal. Also, if I restrict the flow of water at the wall by partially closing the stop valve, the flapper will reseal. Now I need to decide how I'm going to fix it for good....
Thanks.

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Just put a new flapper in (following directions) and see what happens. They're not that expensive and are installed in minutes. You're digging too deep for a first crack at fixing it.
p.s. I suck at plumbing anyway.
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