To replace vanity top

Hi,
I have purchased an antique dining server which I would like to use as a bathroom vanity. And I would actually like to tile the top. The existing top is not appropriate for tiling because in has an elaborate edge and because it would be too thick. So I would like to replace it and also build a little frame around the new top to house the tiles. What's an appropriate material to support that construction? Can I go with compressed particle board (it will be concealed) or should I go for solid wood. Please keep in mind that I don't have a planer or a router. All I have is a table saw, a miter saw and a router.
Many thanks in advance!
Aaron
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Good plywood without voids, you want this to be as solid as possible. Marine plywood would be good choice as it uses waterproof glue.

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Aaron Fude wrote:

Any 3/4" exterior ply, voids are unimportant in your application. Best wih cement board - even 1/4 - over it so you can use thinset to set the tiles. If no cement board, I'd set them in mastic.
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dadiOH
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Yup, exterior ply is the way to go for the sub-base.
Particle board hates moisture and solid wood will be expensive and prone to warping.
However, the OP refers to "a little frame around the new top to house the tiles". I think he may be looking for some kind of hardwood molding to finish the exposed edges...?
Depending on how you want this to look, you can consider:
* Hardwood molding * Special edging tiles * Metal trims of various types (kinda 60's look) * Plastic trims of various types (kinda yuk)
I'd either go with a tile edge finish or the hardwood molding. With the molding, one has to decide whether to stain and match the rest of the piece (may be tricky) or just go for a contrasting color and create an accent.
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We built a vanity for one of our bathrooms. It has a black slate top on it. We used 5/8" marine grade plywood for the top, then put hardie backer board on top of that.
The marine grade plywood resists moisture dameage and the hardie backer board not only resists water but is the best thing you can use to stick your tiles to. It provides a nice strong, flat surface for your tiles.
When we put the plywood in it was inset into the fame of the cabinet then the backer board placed on top of it. It turned out really well.
Particle board would be a real no no. It's VERY susceptable to moisture and may even sag under the weight.
Have you considered recycling the ornate trim to be the frame around your tiles? If you removed it carefully it might look really nice!
Kate PS: I'd be glad to post a photo of ours in the binary group if you'd like to see it.
Hi,
I have purchased an antique dining server which I would like to use as a bathroom vanity. And I would actually like to tile the top. The existing top is not appropriate for tiling because in has an elaborate edge and because it would be too thick. So I would like to replace it and also build a little frame around the new top to house the tiles. What's an appropriate material to support that construction? Can I go with compressed particle board (it will be concealed) or should I go for solid wood. Please keep in mind that I don't have a planer or a router. All I have is a table saw, a miter saw and a router.
Many thanks in advance!
Aaron
Add pictures here
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<%-name%>
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