Tiles over paint?

I would like to put porcelain tile on my covered patio (40x12 feet). The patio is a concrete slab. It does get wet when the wind drives the rain into the patio. I would like to tile it because there are a few small lateral cracks in the concrete slab of the patio.
The concrete slab had originally been covered with a 1/16" plastic coating that looked like tile. When the plastic overlay eventually faded, it was painted with patio paint. That was 7 years ago. The paint is in good shape and is adhering well to the plastic coating. I would use slipsheets over any cracks.
Can I put the new thinset and tiles over the layers of plastic coating plus paint? It looks clean and solid. I don't see how I can remove the plastic coating. It's like rock.
Thanks for any input
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
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It wont last, to get a mortar bed to last not only does the plastic have to come off but scoring the concrete is necessary. Porter Cable used to make a 900$ hand tool for this.
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More details on the plastic coating that looks like tiles will be required. Is it glued down vinyl sheet flooring or actual tiles? Regardless, your best job will be if you remove the old plastic. Some may say you could go over it but I wouldn't. A heat gun and a scraper may do the trick getting it up. Ugly dirty work but will make for a better job with less possible failure down the road.
Now, you can educate me. What are "slipsheets"? I get the meaning and can sort of picture them I think. Unless you have a crack that's straight, like an expansion joint, I would think you would just need to tile over it and hope for the best. Enlighten me.
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if the crack is moving tile will crack too. your probably better off with indoor outdoor carpet.
to put tile down EVERYTHING must be removed, just think sandblaster.
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Best practice would be to remove the plastic and expose some of the concrete but if you want a quick and dirty job, you can probably set the tiles using floor mastic (glue) instead of thinset. 12" or larger natural stone tiles are not advised but a smaller ceramic or porcelin tile should hold up fine.
Not sure what the best grout solution would be since cement based grout would probably crack with a slightly flexible substrate. Perhaps epoxy grout or acrylic or silicone caulk would work out. Regular grout may actually work if it is not as flexible as I am imagining.
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Walter R. wrote:

Not an answer to your original question, but I would be concerned about slip and fall risks when rain hits the patio. Does the tile you're thinking of have a glossy surface?
In my last house, the previous owner got a "good deal" at an estate sale on 1'x2' marble tiles. He decided it would be a good idea to cover the patio slab with them. Looked real nice, but when it rained, you went skating.
Sister-in-law redid her patio last year with flagstone in a mortar bed. Looks real nice, no slip and slide when wet.
Jerry
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Slate would be a good choice outdoors
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call a decorative concrete overlayment contractor
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call a decorative concrete overlayment contractor
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