three breakers share one neutral and one grouding wires

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wrote:

If you want any definite answers, we have to know exactly what kind of service you have. The next step is either a voltage tester or maybe a few photos.
Are the breakers all single pole? (one switch each) If one is double pole, you still may be ok.
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On 29/11/2014 08:10, Seymore4Head wrote:

All breakers are single pole and all wires are 2.5 mm, which is close to gauge 13.
I am convinced that the electrician wires the single phase circuits in 3 phase way.
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wrote:

Then it is wrong.
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2014 03:48:26 -0800 (PST), trader_4

230V single phase would be double pole breakers, wouldn't it? Do they even use a neutral?

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dpb was thinking very hard :

you must live in the splendid isolation of the USA. 3 phase is very common in residentials in the real world. :-?

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John G Sydney.

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On 11/30/2014 4:21 PM, John G wrote: ...

...
Perhaps; not a routine habit in opening service closets when visiting... :)
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On Sunday, November 30, 2014 6:57:09 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

I was rather surprised to see electric boxes exposed in hallways and basements in Germany rather than in closets, and to be covered in plexiglass rather than steel. And yes, you could see 3 phase connections clearly that way.
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On 11/30/2014 7:07 PM, TimR wrote:

But were those single-residence dwellings or multi? I've seen it in England as well but was always in hotels and/or apartment complexes, not single residences. It's the latter I've never poked around in when doing the B&B thingie; figure that's a little "over the top" for an in-house guest even if it is a routine of the household to host... :)
I've not been anywhere in Asia other than one trip to S Korea for a business purpose following a nuclear power plant man-replacement robotic system delivery for which had done most of the software. That was a very uncomfortable trip in the mid-80s when made it and was glad to "get the heck out of Dodge" when it was over. Outside the plant I saw virtually nothing and we were escorted everywhere...think China wouldn't have been any less restricting at that point.
Anyway, the general rules I've always figured were more-or-less universal simply based on the equipment and end use would be something like the following --
"2. Residential Service at 120/208 Volts:
In areas where the secondary distribution system is 208Y Volts, three phase, 4 wire (grounded neutral), residential buildings with one or two dwelling units are served through a single phase, 3 wire, 120/208 Volt common service.
Residential buildings with three or more dwelling units are served through a three phase, 4 wire, common service and the individual single phase, 3 wire, 120/208 Volt sub-services to the individual dwelling units shall be balanced as nearly as possible on the three phases.
All services, other than residential, are served through three phase, 4 wire services except small establishments with limited loads requiring a service of 100 Ampere or less capacity. They may be served through a single phase, 3 wire service."
OP in this thread never indicated despite being asked about what the facility itself was other than clearly was his residence. Sorry he seems to have disappeared w/o ever getting to the bottom of it.
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dpb submitted this idea :

Yes the OP eventually said there were only 2 wires at the building entry so the whole thread is confused by that. As for Distribution.
you must live in the splendid isolation of the USA. 3 phase is very common in residentials in the real world. :-?
In the 50 hertz world-- A lot (I cant say all) distribution is 3 phase 230/400 volts from a big transformer (the one at my front gate is 400 KVA) that serves a number of single residences, most of which get 3 phase because they have 3 phase air conditioners and this has been the practice for many many years. Of course the use of air cons has risen dramatically as the standard of living has risen.
120/240 single phase and 120/208 three phase and small pole pigs is a system limited to the 60 hertz world and certainly not universal.
Too often statements are made as Absolute Facts in various news groups when really they are only the very limited experience of the poster :-Z -Z
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On 12/01/2014 5:07 PM, John G wrote:

As said, nothing was said as "absolute" simply an impression from what I've seen in what overseas I've been at...and while that's a little limited, my time in Germany and England didn't run across any 3P in the single-family housing with which I came into contact -- and that was on the order of a couple dozen I'd guess w/o a firm count. Of course, I'm not sure there was a single one of them that did have A/C; don't recall one...
While particular voltages/frequencies are US, still distribution is 3P until the transformer...and again, it's been mostly 25 yr ago or so since was there a lot and time in Germany was back in the 70s when employer here was trying to start a series of European co-ventures. Babcock-Brown/Boveri in German, Babcock-Atlantique in France, ... All were rather short-lived with the demise of nukes in the US there was no piggy bankroll any longer.
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On Monday, December 1, 2014 6:50:50 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

Another angle on 3 phase showing up in typical houses in other countries would be if it is done, what's the purpose? I see extra cost, but I don;t see a benefit. The loads are all single phase, just like they are here, aren't they?
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 7:26:26 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

I didn't understand that either. My house in Germany had 3P, but as far as I could tell all the loads were 1P. There must be an advantage, maybe somebody can explain it.
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trader_4 explained on 2/12/2014 :

No The general household loads are of course only single phase. In the past some Electric stoves were spread over 2 phases but with increased capacity in the whole system I think that practice has ceased
Many Aircnditioners have 3 phase compressors and single phase 240volt control and fan circuitry.
In recent times there has been a growth in "INVERTOR" air cons and I guess they are only single phase as they are supposed to be more economical.
I have no idea why we have 3phase 400 volt compressors and the USA manages with just single phse 240volt compressors but that is a system designers area not a simple electric technicians job :-?
--
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