three breakers share one neutral and one grouding wires

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I ask an electrician to install several outlets on three breakers. I found that the electrician uses only five wires in the trunking. Apparently, there is one grounding, one neutral and three hot wires. The grounding and neutral wires are shared by three breakers.
How safe is it to do it this way? (Please forget about NEC as this is not in the US.)
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wrote:

Sounds like 3 phase wye. You see that here in the US but only in commercial. If they have 3 phase in residential there, that is what you are looking at.
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On 19/11/2014 13:50, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thank you. That must be it.
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On 11/19/2014 12:30 AM, yyy378 wrote:

It's not right
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:06:09 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

e

It's not right that he asks a question and only says that the location is not in the USA. Some kind of secret or a troll?
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On 11/19/2014 05:20 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Who knows, but no matter what country he's in that method would be incorrect.
With three circuits, at least two of them would share the same "hot" wire with the neutral having to bear (up to) twice the load that it's rated for. This assumes all wires are of the same gauge and rated for the same current as the breaker.
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 9:08:51 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

The

Not if they are on different phases, eg an Edison circuit. Which again is why you need to know the rest of the story.
This assumes all wires are of the same gauge and rated for

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On 11/19/2014 09:37 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Has anyone ever seen a residence with three phase?
What's an Edison circuit? He did not believe in AC
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 12:58:45 PM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

The OP didn't say it's a residence or give any indication at all as to wher e it's located. He did say it's not in the USA and IDK about you, but while I've traveled around the world quite a bit, I can't say that I've analyzed how the systems work even in the countries that I have visited, much less all the other countries.
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On 11/20/2014 05:56 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I assumed he was talking about his own house, but who knows.
Also: Even though at least one person here mentioned that three phase residential power is common in Europe it is still a safe assumption to say single phase is the most widely used /residential/ distribution system world-wide.
That said: It is probable that if someone from outside the US asked a question here...they very well may in Europe so my initial assumption could very well have been wrong.
My only experience with European power distribution was when I was stationed in Germany in the early 70's. Some of my friends had turn-tables that were designed for 60hz and Germany was 50hz.
Though they could use a step down transformer to give them 115v, the turn-table was too slow...so I had them wrap a few turns of electrical tape around the drive wheel.
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On 19/11/2014 17:50, trader_4 wrote:

Oh, I'm in Myanmar. Here, you have single and three phases co-exist in residential dwellings, sometimes in the same building. And every house has a generator is the owner can afford one. Blackout happens several times a day. Every major piece of appliance is protected with a safeguard which cuts off the current if voltage is too high or too low, most of the time too low. The voltage is usually around 180 volt.
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On 11/22/2014 07:05 PM, yyy378 wrote:

If you have three phase power then what the electrician did is probably OK.
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On 11/24/2014 1:14 PM, philo wrote:

Yeah, 'cepting up way early he's insisted there are only two service leads to the panel so it can't be three phase.
I'd also suspect that 3- and single-phase don't exist side-by-side routinely even in Myanmar in residential dwellings unless they're sizable apartment complexes--it isn't logical they'd go to the expense.
It's frustrating that the OP doesn't just follow-up with a picture or two on one of the hosting sites...it would be interesting to see the actual setup if nothing else.
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It could be OK. It might be a 120V circuit and a 240V circuit. Not enough info to tell. One breaker would have to be a double pole type.
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On 11/19/2014 08:29 AM, Seymore4Head wrote:

Except he said "three" circuits and a total of five wires. 3 hot, 1 neutral, I ground
Putting code aside, from a purely safety stand point it would be safe only if the wires were double the gauge required... and that /not/ all three shared the same "hot" side. I rather doubt that's the case.
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 9:34:25 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

Unless it is in fact three phase e.g. 120/208 or 277/480 and all hots are o n different phases.
nate
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On 11/19/2014 08:49 AM, N8N wrote:

Yes, but very unlikely to see 3 phase in a residence.
Only once have I seen it...and it was simply because the people had purchased a small warehouse with an elevator and converted the building to a residence.
The three phase circuitry was completely separate from all other wiring and used exclusively for the elevator.
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There are lots of countries that have 3 phase in a dwelling
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On 11/19/2014 12:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

From "Worldstandards"
"three-phase electricity is rarely used for domestic purposes"
Of course that does not mean that it is /never/ user but I think the OP has been scared off now
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Wrong. This is perfectly fine if it's a 3-phase circuit.
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