The great ethanol scam continues

Page 1 of 3  
http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/conserving-freedom/2011/nov/10/american-ethanol-disaster /
or
http://preview.tinyurl.com/c72w8cn
Blighted harvest: The American corn ethanol disaster
"Perhaps the most devastating effect of the ethanol industry is the destruction of the small engine. An in depth analysis shows that when a gasohol mixture contains more than 0.5% water (which can easily accumulate due to humidity on a hot day), the ethanol starts to decompose, forming a single phase separation layer of ethanol and water at the bottom of a fuel tank. Because this small layer of ethanol and water does not support combustion, it gets sucked into the engine, clogging up and permanently destroying the carburetor.
Billions of dollars have been spent in the past few years on countless lawn mowers, weed eaters/trimmers, blowers, lawn equipment, boat, and other small engines that have all failed due to ethanol corruption. While this dynamic has provided a huge boost to the small engine creation and repair industries, it has consistently put consumers at a severe disadvantage.
For example, “water damage” of a carburetor is no longer covered by product warranties or protection (insurance) plans on lawn equipment. This failure is specifically considered the fault of the owner, even when the product recommends using E15. "
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ted wrote:

I say this is urban myth or just plain wrong.
Water is not going to "clog" up the carburetor, and certainly not "permanently" destroy it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/11/2011 8:24 PM, Home Guy wrote:

water damage is not immediate but it will corrode the insides of the carburator over time
briggs and stratten web site has some videos and photos of the damage ethanol causes
i found that the local airport sells mogas that is ethanol-free so i buy my lawnmower/chainsaw gas there
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the small engine companies should be required to redesgn their products to use high ethanol content fuel. just like they did to run on unleaded fuel
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob haller wrote:

But it's not the ethanol that's the problem - it's the water in the tank (supposedly according to the OP).
I thought that most small engines have a fine mesh screen (steel or nylon / plastic?) either in the tank or somewhere in the fuel line that is too fine to allow water to pass through. ?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/11/2011 9:48 PM, Home Guy wrote:

Good luck with that one. Water molecules are pretty small, far smaller than hexane and heptane molecules (which are the principal constituents of gasoline). Any filter that is too fine to let a water molecule through sure as heck isn't going to let gasoline or ethanol through either.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Are you considering surface tension in your comment?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Yes. It is. Check viscosity & molecular responses to the screen materials.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

I've never seen one that didn't.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 11:40:39 -0500, "Twayne"

I've seen LOTS of them with no screens at all.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They actually made changes to accommodate lead free fuel???? The GOOD engines always did have hardened valve seats, and the cheap crap still does not. Emission controlled engines (fixed jet) can NOT adapt to differing ethanol concentrations, even if the carb was made to be resistant to ethanol/water damage. That's why cars are electronically controlled and fuel injected. Feedback carbs worked kinda-half - and even that is too complex for the average "small engine"
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/11/11 10:10 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Fifty years ago in UK there was a 5%-alcohol gasoline called "Cleveland Distol," which I often used in my motorcycle. The carburetor was an Amal with many different sizes of main jet available, but I never heard never any suggestion that a different size jet was needed for that fuel.
People have mentioned the water problem. At that time many motorcycle enthusiasts (I don't know about car enthusiasts) were experimenting with water injection, but I think that it might have been injected between the carburetor and the inlet manifold.
Perce
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 22:37:06 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

5% ethanol is only 1 2.5% difference in energy content. E10 is 5%. Your old Amal carbed James (or whatever) was likely running rich to start with, so a 2.5% leaning wasn't serious.
Today's small engines are already running on the lean edge, due to environmental legislation - so 5% leaning is serious. And yes, water injection wad between the carb and the INTAKE VALVE - usually in the manifold - so there was NO water inside the carburetor fuel passages, float bowl, needle valve, etc.
Water injection was only advantageous in high compression engines, or when trying to run on low octane fuel. It was insispensible when running on Kerosene because it kept the combustion temperatures low enough that the low octane fuel did not detonate.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 21:58:13 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Better yet - the government should get out of the corn support business and forget about mandating fuel changes they know nothing about. Corn likker should be used for keeping politicians enebriated to the point they are totally HARMLESS, not just useless. Perhaps then they'd have a suppressed libido that would keeep them out of trouble as a bonus.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 22:20:37 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Lived all my life south of the 49th.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which includes all of southern Ontario. But I guess that was the point you're trying to make - eh?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 22:16:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Amen!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Newer motors are equipped. Retrofitting all the older units is a rather daunting task though.
The gas companies and the movement should stop wasting money making that stuff. It is not efficient. Most cars lose about 2 mpg when the winter blend hits the market.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's all toss out our small gas engines and buy new ones. Great idea, troll!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 20:24:08 -0500, Home Guy wrote:

But... water doesn't support combustion, and we all know that the carburetor is the part of the engine where things go bang! If the water just sits there because it can't burn, it'll eventually dry out and go all sticky ;-)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.