Tempering tank for hot water system

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wrote Re Re: Tempering tank for hot water system:

Because very few people drink water from their hot water heater. If they do, they usually heat it up more while cooking, making coffee/tea, etc. thus killing any bacteria that might be present.
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oh anyone can drink once heated water easily.
your wife washes her hands in hot water turns water off, walks away.....
10 minutes later you came in and get a drink of water from the tap.
the once heated water is trapped in the faucet, your drink is partially once heated water
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I say urban myth, just look at all of those giant water tanks supplying communities all over the world that dont make people sick. Then there is chlorine that kills what really makes you sick and legionela.
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Yes, but In the civilized world, where disease is under control, the water from those tanks is treated with cholrine before being delivered to the user. In the case of a water heater, one could have a domestic well, which is an entirely different situation.
I tend to agree though that from a practical standpoint, of all the legionaire stories I've ever read, none that I've seen involved getting it from a domestic water heater.
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I don't quite agree with this statement. Electric heaters have heating elements that are threaded into the side of the tank but the element extends into or past the center of the tank. The bottom element comes on first to do the major portion of heating the water and the top element helps keep the temp at the set temp - as I understand it.
Steve
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wrote:

I don't quite agree with this statement. Electric heaters have heating elements that are threaded into the side of the tank but the element extends into or past the center of the tank. The bottom element comes on first to do the major portion of heating the water and the top element helps keep the temp at the set temp - as I understand it.
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The top element heats the water near the outlet, then the lower element heats the rest of the water. Thus, you get hot water faster than if you just used the lower element.
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Did you know that if the top element goes out, the bottom one will not work? It happened to me.
Steve
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I am wondering if this study is considering what the source of the water is?? Public water supply system such as in residential and city areas? Or rural drilled wells?? Or is the bacteria inherrent in any water supply?
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It's found in nature but is resistant to chlorine. Heat is the best killer. Ironically, if you read deeper into the studies, you find that homes with electric water heaters and copper plumbing had a significantly lower incidence of the bacteria compared to homes with galvanized pipes.
They think the bacteria feeds on iron and is killed by copper. But the studies are somewhat inconclusive on that.
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Well, maybe I'm somewhat safe as I only have copper plumbing. In no way am I calling you, the messenger, paranoid. I'd like to thank you for bringing this to my attention. I plan to do some more reading into this. Thanks!
Steve
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pssst..... i rekon the whole thing is just bullshit.
s
otherwise 1 third of our neighbors would be dead.
s
wrote:

I am wondering if this study is considering what the source of the water is?? Public water supply system such as in residential and city areas? Or rural drilled wells?? Or is the bacteria inherrent in any water supply?
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Well, the symptoms mimick pneumonia so it's hard to make a firm diagnosis. The people most at risk for death are those with weakened immune systems, smokers, and elderly.
Otherwise, you could think you had a bad case of bronchitis or some other respiratory infection and not know you had Legionaire's Disease. If you catch it early, it's cured with antibiotics. .
You get it from breathing in the mists in the shower.
Then again, I suppose you can't believe anything the CDC or World Health Organizations write.
or can you?
Since you guys are so skeptical---read this:
Each year, between 8,000 and 18,000 people are hospitalized with Legionnaires' disease in the U.S. However, many infections are not diagnosed or reported, so this number may be higher. More illness is usually found in the summer and early fall, but it can happen any time of year. What are the symptoms of Legionnaires' disease?
Legionnaires' disease can have symptoms like many other forms of pneumonia, so it can be hard to diagnose at first. Signs of the disease can include: a high fever, chills, and a cough. Some people may also suffer from muscle aches and headaches. Chest X-rays are needed to find the pneumonia caused by the bacteria, and other tests can be done on sputum (phlegm), as well as blood or urine to find evidence of the bacteria in the body.
These symptoms usually begin 2 to 14 days after being exposed to the bacteria.
A milder infection caused by the same type of Legionella bacteria is called Pontiac Fever . The symptoms of Pontiac Fever usually last for 2 to 5 days and may also include fever, headaches, and muscle aches; however, there is no pneumonia. Symptoms go away on their own without treatment and without causing further problems.
Pontiac Fever and Legionnaires' disease may also be called "Legionellosis" (LEE-juh-nuh-low-sis) separately or together.
How serious is it? What is the treatment?
Legionnaires' disease can be very serious and can cause death in up to 5% to 30% of cases. Most cases can be treated successfully with antibiotics [drugs that kill bacteria in the body], and healthy people usually recover from infection.
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From other articles I have read, it sounds like it is most likely to occur where water has been stagnant for a period of time like in a water leg to a faucet that doesn't get used very often. If water is continually being used daily through a hot water heater system, there seems to be less of a chance of occurrance. But there are lots and lots of studies done on this and it depends on which ones you tend to believe. Also, large buildings with huge hot water distribution systems can be particularly vulnerable and especially the outer reaches of the hot water systems. Lots of interesting stuff that I wouldn't have known about if not for the Rick-Meister bringing this up...........
Thanks! Steve
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