Temorary roof repair from attic

Page 1 of 2  
I live in one of the areas that was hit this week by a major ice storm.
An ice laden tree branch fell from a tree near the house an unfortunately poked a small (about three quarters of an inch) hole through the shingles and roof deck.
The roof is still ice covered and for my safety I'd rather not go up there. Which leaves me to try to make a temporary patch from below.
The best thing I can think of is to use canned expanding foam from below, perhaps poking a hole in the bottom of a plastic cup, and filling the cup from the bottom with the open end of the cup against the hole.
Anyone else successfully made a temporary roof patch from the attic side? If so, how did you do it?
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That sounds like a good way to do it till spring. Maybe a pan in the attic to catch any resiudual leakage before it messes up your drywall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Sivori wrote: ...

Sounds reasonable in the short term until the ice melts and to minimize any direct entry.
There will be, of course, more damage than just the hole that will need repairing when it warms up again but if the serious leak problem is that small you're probably in decent shape until can get up there.
I presume this means the limb is still there as well, or did it come on down after the hit? If it's there still, you'll want to get up there when you can to get if off, obviously at which time can inspect and decide where/how much repair is required in the short term as opposed to "can wait"...
--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 12:52:07 -0600, dpb wrote:

You're right. I'm just looking for a temporary repair until I can get inspections, estimates, and the insurance company's involvement. Damage in the Louisville KY area is widespread enough that just getting estimates will take a while, and of course actual repair will be even an longer wait.

Yep, it is still decorating my roof. It is a fair sized branch, larger in diameter than my arm but smaller than my leg.
Here's a photo:
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/EX7fJPJABV4Mbs9nBCVlbw?feat=directlink
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For something that small you should consider just paying someone to fix it now, its probably as much or less than your deductable
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the weather is anything like Illinois now, no roofer will take the job until the ice gone. And any roofer that does take the job... you wont be able to contact again in the spring when it starts leaking because it couldn't be done properly now with all this ice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote in

What ladder would be stable with ice everywhere it touches?

Under the current conditions, ice wall climbing shoes would fit that bill.

<bad feeling sensed here considering conditions>

Only possible under the conditions by staying in house.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 31 Jan 2009 01:01:52 -0600, letterman wrote:

Heh, no way, no how. I'm not doing anything up there (or up on a ladder) until the ice melts. The forecast high for tomorrow is 47, and above freezing again for Monday, so most of it may disappear soon.

That's what I'm worried about and why I'm leaving the branch be until later.

I'd call that one mixed luck for sure. It beats a broken back, but a pile of fresh hay would have been a more pleasant experience.

The house was built in 1955. As was common practice in this area at that time, the roof is sheathed with the concrete forming boards from the basement. The boards are 1 inch thick and of varying width, most but not all are around 1x4. The board that broke was a narrow one, based on memory probably a 1x2.

That might be what happened.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 01 Feb 2009 04:09:55 -0600, letterman wrote:

The foam held, no drips in the attic. All the snow ice melted off that side of the roof, so I was able to get up there are remove the branch and inspect the roof.
The hole seems to be the only damage. I couldn't find any cracked shingles, the worse I saw were a few cap shingles with tree bark skid marks.
I don't have any estimates yet, but it is looking like it might not exceed my $500 homeowner's deductible.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cold foam takes hours to cure, maybe put it on and screw wood or cardboard to hold it in place. Foam in can is sprayed with can upside down or air comes out, it might get a bit of foam in a new can. Adding on a longer hose can make the foam barely come out. I would not use a real cold can. But it sounds like a small hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Cold foam takes hours to cure, maybe put it on and screw wood or cardboard to hold it in place. Foam in can is sprayed with can upside down or air comes out, it might get a bit of foam in a new can. Adding on a longer hose can make the foam barely come out. I would not use a real cold can. But it sounds like a small hole.
Maybe take a 4inch by 4 inch square piece of plywood or similar add some silicon caulking to the top and screw it up with small screws..Add a bucket under it and you should be good for a while....It will keep the critters out better than cardbosrd and foam...You could throw up a rope with a loop in it to drag the branch off...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 15:28:25 -0500, benick wrote:

That was a problem. But I did manage to get a decent amount of foam in the hole; hopefully water won't pour in when the snow and ice finally melt.

I'll try that of the foam doesn't hold. I hope I don't have to go back up there. I have a low slung hip roof, and it is more like a crawl space than attic.

I hadn't thought of the squirrels. If they get in I will have trouble.

I'd rather throw it off, if I can. Dragging it off might damage the roof more, but in a way the gutters are more important since they are so far undamaged.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Tony Sivori" wrote:

Maybe you can get a cheap kitty litter pan up there under it to help? Tarp under it? Then glue a sort of funnel of plastic (duct tape wont be as good as cheap rubber cement for this I think) to make sure drips hit the catpan. You'd have to check it pretty often come first sign of melt but might work. Havr to have a way to empty the catpan. Syphon it off like I do my fishtank (hose in water, cap on end with finger, put that in lower container and let loose and it flows out by natural physics).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cshenk wrote:

Check on it to see if water is collecting or the inside of the deck is wet. This is getting to sound like fibber mcgee's closet :o)
Others have offered good safety tips - most important.
Difficult to tell from the photo, but looks like large branches overhang the roof - still loaded with ice?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 31 Jan 2009 10:06:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Almost all the small branches in the upper right of the photo are in contact with the roof. The good news is that they are not broken and are barely touching the roof.
It was above freezing today and most of the ice fell off the wires and trees. I expect that the unbroken drooping branches will spring back to their normal position soon.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The foam sounds like as good an idea as any. But mostly likely there will still be leakage, you'd be surprised what a puddle it can make from a small hole. So the main thing is to have something to put under it to catch the drips. The drips may come down somewhere downhill from the hole itself. If you have one of those cheap plastic kiddy pools, stick that up there; otherwise the biggest pan or tub or whatever you can find. -- H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Heathcliff wrote:

Good grief! For a hole that size, stick a cork in it and put a smidgen of caulk around on the inside....should be good enough until weather is decent. Call ins. co. anyway, since you don't know for sure the extent of the damage. Sounds like things are pretty awful up there. Stay safe :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 16:50:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

The electric has gone out twice today, just for a few minutes. I think they're turning it off once in while just to remind me how lucky I am to have power. :-)
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I\'m filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Sivori wrote:

I haven't done it, but here's an idea.
Clean out the hole from below as best you can. Put some warmed up asphalt roof cement in a small paper cup. Place the top of the cup over the hole, then push firmly on the bottom to force the cement up through the hole. Tape the cup in place to keep the cement in place. You could start by smearing the sides of the hole with the cement first to get a good bond, and push cement in between the various roofing layers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As you said or wet/dry roof cement liberally smeared with a bucket underneath.
A small cheap funnel might be able to be glued into place with either method to direct the inevitable flow.
Good luck from Lexington.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.