Suggestions For The Beginner's Toolbox

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Here are essentials: Screw drivers, pliers, needle nose pliers, side cutters, Vice grip pliers, chisels, 10' tape measure, combination square, claw hammer, nail set, crosscut saw, wrench or socket set, putty knife, block plane, rasp, hacksaw, toilet plunger, level, utility knife, duct tape, various screws/nails. If you have any money left over: corded power drill, shop vac, circular saw, awl, framing square, trouble light, backsaw, pip wrench, various clamps. bench olane, chalk line, staple gun, vise, grinder, propane torch (great for starting the charcoal BBQ). Also, consider some safety items: fire extinguisher, goggles, respirator, ear muffs or ear plugs, rubber gloves, first-aid kit. A sturdy solid work bench should be one of your first projects. Makita, Milwaukee, Bosch, DeWalt are usually good brands for power tools. Congrats on your marriage!
On 6 Nov 2004 18:10:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Fleemo) wrote:

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Before I got married, my future wife bought me a Makita cordless drill. That tool has paid for itself over and over again as we remodel our house. This is a decent drill, but the Dewalt cordless drill is probably better.
Don't buy tools until you need them. What you need depends on what project you are doing.
I have been on a molding kick as I have been remodeling bedrooms. So the miter saw has been priceless. A portable air compressor also is great tool for bradnailers or shooting texture on walls. Every project you do yourself pays for the tools you use.
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Man! I completely struck gold!!!
Thank you all for sharing a bit o' your wisdom here. I'm blown away by the great suggestions, and I got a handful of belly laughs to boot. You guys are great.
You've also made me realize I need to focus on the work space as well, which I'll ask about in a new thread.
A thousand thank yous!
-Fleemo
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Sorry for coming in late on the thread...
To get first: Basic hand tools: screwdrivers, hammer, tape mesure, level, utility knife, channel lock pliers, needle nose pliers, vise grip pliers and a small "tool box saw" Putty knife, and 8" drywall knife
I also recomend one of those "stanley wonder bars" kinda like a crowbar, but flat steel.
Power tools: Variable speed drill (pref cordless) Jig saw.
To get next:
Framing square, Circular saw, chisels, as many differant kinds of wrenches you can find, recipricating saw, another drill,
By this point, you will have an idea of what kind of projects you will be doing, and can gather accordingly.
One note I will add that is differant from what others have said on here. buy cheap tools to start. For $200.00, you could get one of almost everything, but the cheap models. As the tools wear out or break (and they will quickly) replace them with medium to high end tools. This keeps your inital cost down, and lets you get the better tools over time. this way, you will also have an idea of what you use and what you don't. No sence in buying a $200.00 router and use it once, when you could have had a $30.00 drill, 80.00 router, 40.00 circ saw, and 50.00 of hand tools. when the drill wears out in a year (or less) then spend a hundred bucks for one and use it forever. Meanwhile, the 80$ router can sit on the shelf as well as the 200$ one.
email: dallyn_spam at yahoo dot com please respond in this NG so others can share your wisdom as well!
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I'd start with a couple of expensive, high quality books like the Black n Decker, "Home Repair" and "Home Improvement" books.
A "toolbox" is essential, like previous poster mentioned. I like the BucketBoss TM tool organizer check out www.bucketboss.com This sort of organizer makes it easier to get the tools to the project site.
I have a great Stanley 15-333 "Folding Pocket Saw" Go to www.stanleytools.com , then click "saws", "specialty saws". It accepts any recipricating or sabre saw to suit the task at hand.
Don't buy junk. There's nothing more frustrating than a cheap tool.
Mr Fixit eh
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On 11/30/2004 1:42 PM US(ET), Steve Nekias took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

I just bought a red canvas one at HD last week. Fits a standard 5 gallon joint compound tub or paint bucket, or the one that I am using, a 40 lb chlorine tablet container. Various sized pockets, both open end and closed end, and tool loops all over the outside and inside. Cost $10.79 after NY tax.

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