Speaking of front load washers

While we're talking about front load washers, what's with the price of the drawer pedestals sold to raise them up??? Buying two of them adds $400-500 to the price! This has got to be an ADP (additional dealer profit) type item....
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course. And I just built a matching platform out of 2x10s and plywood, spray painted to match the appliances color. Cost me about $50 for all the materials and 2 hours of labor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paul Franklin wrote:

Screw the peds, get the stack. Separate units side by side is a waste of space. Put a full wardrobe / cabinet in the space vacated by the extra box.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How do you stack them? Is it some kind of steel frame skeleton you must buy?
Other option is to get ONE machine that does BOTH washing and drying
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

It depends on the machines / manufacturer. There are some models that are designed to operate side by side or stacked, while others are an integral one piece factory assembled stack design. Single unit washer/dryers aren't very common.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nor are they very effective according to Consumer Reports. Must be why thyare not very common.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Most stackable units either come with a bracket or have a bracket kit available as an option.

My experience with those in the UK is that they do a poor job at both washing and drying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed 12 Mar 2008 06:07:09p, Rick Blaine told us...

They're also quite limiting time-wise, since you have to wait for a complete wash/dry cycle to complete before doing another load. Separate units allow for putting a load of wash in while a previouisly washed load is in the dryer. ...But I guess that's obvious. :-)
--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would prefer ONE box that does both wash and dry, heck I would buy two if it worked really well.
people will happily pay for convenience today with our rush rush lives
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

In that case, you should go ahead and replace your water heater with a TANKLESS model as money is apparently no object.
The all-in-one washer/dryer combo is notoriously expensive and inefficient. They are often found in RVs. I have yet to hear anything good about them.
http://www.splendide.com
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

When we travel in Europe, we rent an apartment, and the combined units are very common there. All those we have used have cleaned well, but are relatively slow in drying. We just do a load overnight, and one while we are out during the day. Its worth it because we don't have to haul as many clothes with us.
When I suggested one for our home, my wife objected since she likes to get all the laundry done in one day a week, rather than spending multiple days because of the long time the combined unit takes to finish one load. She also likes having a lot of space on top of the units for a work surface.
If gas prices keep going up, I may get her a clothesline.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I line dry as much as possible. The clothes don't get worn out so fast as using a dryer all the time. You just have to plan ahead when you need the clothes. If you have children this may be hard to do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed 19 Mar 2008 08:55:09p, Marina told us...

as

the

If you live in an area where there are spontaneous and unexpected dust storms, it's not a very practical idea. You just have to wash them again. :-)
--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LOL I also have a small space inside for line drying. In the winter with low humidity some things can take less than 1 day to dry. In the summer with 80% humidity, well it can take a few days. Big items like towels/sheets then I use a dryer. It also helps to only have 1 person in the household,too. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Summer has never been a problem for me with drying, as there's always some sort of breeze. But, oh my good God, when I was a kid my mother would hang clothes outside in the middle of Winter, and when you brought the sheets inside you could stand them on edge until the finally warmed enough to fold...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Another strategy is to buy clothes that are not all cotton..... they dry faster and wrinkle less
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 24, 11:18am, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

-- Another strategy is to buy clothes that are not all -- cotton..... they dry faster and wrinkle less
Or go naked - dries fast, but still subject to wrinkling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 12, 1:24pm, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

re: ONE machine that does BOTH washing and drying
Unless you've got 4 kids and usually have both the washer and dryer going at once. One unit would really slow us down.
Then there's the fact that we all have some items that get hung up, so we'd have to be ready to dig them out before the dry cycle began. Besides the timing issue, it's much easier to do while transferring clothes from the washer to the dryer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, you do gain some floor space, but at what price? Being 6' 5", I am spoiled with the pedestal that raises both washer and dryer up to a level where I don't have to strain my back loading and unloading laundry.
Then I put cabinets above both units for storage, and my wardrobe closet is elsewhere.
Just my thoughts; of course, YMMV.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was thinking the same thing. I have cabinets over the washer and dryer that go up to the ceiling, with a small bar in between for hanging up clothes. Far more useful storage than I'd have if I had just one vertical cabinet the width of the dryer. I'd be constantly bending over and lifting heavy items and have no hanging space. Again, YMMV.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.