Smooth, glossy paint surface


I've painted some ceiling fan blades, after roughing and priming them, with Benjamin Moore glossy latex enamel for metal. I dunno, somehow I had the impression, that the point was to create a smooth, shiny surface. Well, this paint doesn't seem to be self-leveling: the brushstrokes are immortalized in the surface. Can this paint be polished? Or should I be using something else?
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Harlan Messinger wrote:

What are the blades made of? If metal, why not just use a spray paint?
If you really want a baby's ass smooth surface, you need to be looking into automotive finishes, like a lacquer or catalyzed enamel that is applied with a spray gun.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

They're plastic.
I actually started with Rustoleum spray paint for plastic surfaces, and got the same result I got when I would use spray paint years and years ago as a kid: sudden spurts resulting in dark streaks. That sure wasn't what I wanted!

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What's Yer brush like? You need a very fine-bristle brush or,,better yet,,a 3" foam brush for the wide areas and maybe a 1" and 2" for the narrow areas unless You take the blades apart..You will need to use emery cloth or something fine grit to get rid of the lines now that You have them..Fan blades are balanced weight-wise,,I dunno how much paint it would take to throw them out of balance and wear on the bearings.If all else fails try thinning some of the paint a bit and test on a similar surface..
Harlan Messinger wrote:

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Foam brush--I should have thought of that! I'll give it a try. Thanks.
Dean wrote:

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Harlan Messinger wrote:

Were you using the same paint can as when you were a kid? The only time you get spurts and streaks is if your technique is very bad, if the paint can hasn't been shaken enough, or if the paint is very old.
Get a fresh can of Krylon and if it doesn't work, you will know it is your technique. Painting with a can is not difficult but you must start spray off the object for each stroke and stop the spray before the end of the stroke, follow the direction for distance from nozzle to objects and maintain that distance, and put light amounts on with each stroke (move your arm fairly rapidly). Good luck!
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Harlan Messinger wrote:

My suggestion is to sand it down to smooth finish. Use a find grade sand paper. Next buy a couple cans of AUTOMOTIVE paint and primer. Use as directed. You may need to practice a little. If you sand through the "plastic" paint down to the plastic, use a little more of the plastic paint.
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On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 09:39:19 -0500, Harlan Messinger

In addition to using a quality brush, you might want to add some Flotrol to the paint per package directions.
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