Small engine question, does a few drops of gas in the spark plug hole do long term damage

When i haven't used a tool in a few months and it is hard to start, i find that Taking out the spark plug, and putting a few drops of gas in there, and replacing the Plug, helps get it started. The question is, can this do long term damage? It less than 1/2 a thimble i put in.
I know too much gas could hydrolock which would be bad so I keep it too a very small amount.
Can the gas wash the oil off the cylinder walls and cause Excess wear? I don't see how that could happen.
Mark
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On Sunday, January 25, 2015 at 4:08:53 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It would take a lot more than that wee little shot to hydrolock it. You'd have to fill it up with enough liquid, little air that it couldn't compress it. And catch it at the right part of the cycle too.

Sure it can, but that small amount, just at start up, I would think it would take so many starts for it to have any real effect, the motor would have died from something else first. Starting ether serves the same purpose, with the same possible side effects. I only use it though on the rare occasion an engine won't start, not for routine start attempts.
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Mark,
I doubt that the small amount of gas you are using will damage the engine in any way. Have you tried starter fluid?
Dave M.
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On 01/25/2015 03:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It would only be harmful if you did not start the engine and put it in storage like that
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On 1/25/2015 4:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I can't commnt on gasoline,but I do remember the time a "helpful" neighbor killed my Dad's generator, with ether in the spark plug hole.
I can see how that would happen. Similar happened to my Dad.
I've heard that gas in the spark hole trick from old timers.
Being a young fellow, I take off the air filter, and put a few drops in by the choke plate, into the air flow. Some times I spray a quick bit of ether on to the air filter.
- . Christopher Young Fellow learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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I'd say a shot glass is way too much for a small engine. Clearance volume on a 208 cc engine with 7:1 compression ratio is 36.66 cc, which is only 3/4 of a shot glass (1.5 oz shot vs 1.17 oz).
If you are talking a 400cc engine (10hp, +/-) it is still too much. - you will drown the spark plug.
A spoonfull of gas in the plug hole is more than enough to make it fire. I generally put about the equivalent of a thimblefull in the INTAKE - where you are safe to put more than in the plug hole. Too much will wash the oil off the cyls too - but you would have to do it a lot to do serious harm.
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On Sunday, January 25, 2015 at 6:31:00 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I agree. OP said half a thimble and that sounds about right. A shot glass is way too much. Personally, I just use ether. Very easy too, just spray some in from the can that lasts 10 years.
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 17:39:16 -0500, "David L. Martel"

Using starting fluid requires restraint and finesse in order to not cause a problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Fire in the hole! just like after a spicy peeper sandwich.
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 13:08:49 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've NEVER had to do that with any gas engine, 2 or 4 stroke. You should learn how the fuel system works for your engine. It's not rocket science. You could wind up stripping the threads, especially with aluminum heads.
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 13:08:49 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That sounds like a lot of trouble. No, it's not too much gas to hydrolock it, and while it will wash off the oil from the cylinder walls, it's not significant. But here is a better way. Get a pump oil can. (Made to fill with oil and lubricate stuff, by pumping the trigger). Put some gas in that can, and pump a few squirts into the carburetor. (you have to remove the air cleaner cover, but that's easier than taking out the spark plug). You dont have to replace the air cleaner cover (YET), just try to get the engine to start. If it wont start, spray a little more gas in the carb. Once the engine is running, you should put the air cleaner cover back. Just be careful doing that while th engine is running.
Dont leave gas in your pump oil can real long or it goes bad.
This is much better for the engine than using Starting Fluid, which can damage engines.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com:

I remember doing something like that driving home through the back streets of Waikiki - only it was Yours Truly laying across the fender well pouring gasoline into the throat of the carburetor.
Now, when I read about some kid doing something that seems psychotically stupid, I think back to that day and say to myself "Oh well....".
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

My first teaching job was filling in for the idiot that tried to get an old bus engine in the shop running by pouring gas down the carb from a can or cup while a student cranked it over. 2nd and 3rd degree burns on arm, chest, face and groin - out of commision for over 9 months.
An old gasoline blowtorch - or even a pump oil can - is a LOT safer than an open can or cup!!!!
Don't even THINK about dribbling it out the vent of a gas-can!!!!!!
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On Mon, 26 Jan 2015 13:57:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

When necessity calls, we become creative! But then there is the safety factor which is too often overlooked....

I agree about not POURING gas into an engine (carb or intake), while it's running. At least not in any large amount. (A one ounce shot glass would probably be ok).
While I'm the one who mentioned using an pump oil can for /priming/ a small engine or even a car, and mentioned using a propane torch. I never really thought about using a /Gasoline blow torch/. I suppose that could work and work quite well.
But that got me thinking...... I winder how one of those pressurized tanks from the old gasoline Coleman camping stoves would work? JUST A THOUGHT!!!! Heck, that could even be injected into the intake via a vacuum hose.... (Of course, only for engine testing, NOT DRIVING).....
I might just have to try that sometime!!!!
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On Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:19:22 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I made my living as a mechanic for about 25 years, staring in the late sixties, and an old gasoline blowtorch got a lot of use for starting stubborn engines. It was always in the back of the '43 power wagon tow truck on service calls.
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If the engine backfires into the intake and you get a carb fire, just pray the battery doesn't die, and suck the flame in!!.
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 13:08:49 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I usually put a petrol-soaked rag in the carby mouth with the choke full on (at least initially). (Btw a big rag, you don't want it sucked into the engine.) The rag chokes the engine as well as providing a rich mixture.
Ross
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