Sink Baskets and putty or caulk

Pretty much anything to do with water, I have trouble with.
I've got a Kohler cast iron sink. Insinkerator on one side and regular drain on the other.
I don't really understand plumbers putty. I never really know how much tight to tighten something down or put in. It's hard keeping them centered also. I've got a small leak on the GD side, and I'm not thrilled about going back through the easy install. What was the hard way, that this is easy?
Anyone have any plumbing words of wisdom to brighten my day?
Jeff
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Jeff Thies wrote:

You tighten until, well, it is tight. Firmly in place. Doesn't wiggle.
You can't use too much putty, excess will squeeze out as you tighten. That's what it is supposed to do.
After things are tight, wipe off excess putty. A pointy piece of wood is handy for grooves.
--

dadiOH
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And you definitely want to use plumbers putty, not caulk. I've seen sinks done by hack jobs using silicone caulk and it's a disaster. Great product, but totally wrong for the application. The PP has the riight consistency and properties to bed the drain in and prevent water from leaking out.
When you tighten it, a good amount of putty should come out from all around the drain. Corrrect tightness is using a pair of pliers, but not forcing it really hard. You want it good and snug, but don't overdo it.
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2010 05:44:04 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The instructions for the last tail-piece I installed in a sink said to use silicone, *NOT* plumber's putty.

Stop just before it breaks. ;-)
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On Dec 31, 10:39 am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Probably because it was made in china and they don't know any better.

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On Fri, 31 Dec 2010 07:56:25 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It was probably made in China, but the instructions weren't.

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On Dec 31, 10:06 am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I've always used silicone rubber and never had any problems with either looks or leaks.
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2010 09:28:15 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

The only concern I would have is replacement may be more difficult.
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The one I just did in the bathroom said to use caulk which I did...No leaks...
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Also, warm it in your hands, rolling it into a "rope," which makes it easier to place. Excess simply squeezes out.
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